Nathan Bransford, Author


Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Writing Time vs. Reading Time?

Sandro Botticelli, "Madonna del Magnifcat"

Do you ever have that creeping feeling that if you added up all the hours people in the world spend writing books and all the hours people spend reading books that writing time might win?

Are there more people out there writing right now than reading?

What do you think?

(And don't look at me, I probably spend more time writing than reading these days too.)






94 comments:

Bane of Anubis said...

Counting texting, twittering, facebooking, blogging, etc... probably.

Jonathon Arntson said...

I think the fact that writing is harder for me than reading makes this an interesting comparison. Are we all self-loathing weirdos and reading is our rare reward?

Liberty Speidel said...

Considering the fact that it probably takes at least 1000 hours to write (and rewrite and edit) a decent novel, and it takes about 8 - 10 hours to read said novel for the average person, I'd say that assessment is probably spot on.

Ashelyn Nicole said...

That's a really good question. I mean, what do you consider reading? Most of my day is spent reading newspapers, magazines, blogs (and the Dewey Decimal System at work). I think that people still find more time to read than to write---but perhaps they do not read books. The nooks, kindles, and ereaders have probably shifted this since it's conception, though, and if the US economy hadn't banked so terrible, I'm certain that less people would frequent the library for a free trip to Narnia.

I guess it really all depends on what you define as "reading" as to whether or not the general public writes more than it reads.

Ted Fox said...

Well, I didn't think about it before, but now I am. Thanks a lot, Nathan.

Seriously, though, even if it isn't true for books on their own, if you add in social media, it would seem like there has to be more people writing than reading. Perhaps that's why the quality is always so (cough) high.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get back to blogging my thoughts on automated customer service reps.

Jen Zeman said...

Most certainly writing. Although I really wish I had more time to read - I love it.

Matt Sinclair said...

I think there are more readers of books than writers of books. Assuming that all writers are also readers (and if they aren't, shame on them!), and not all readers are writers, it stands to reason that there are more readers than writers. Still, there are never enough well-written books. So keep writing!

Justus R Stone said...

In terms of time, yes, more writing than reading. Let's face it, I can polish off a novel in a day or two. Doubt it was written as quickly.

But more writers than readers? I wonder. I think everyone has a story to tell. As Bane said, throw in bloggers, tweeters & all forms of written expression as "writers" and I'd agree, yes. But narrow that field into the context of those who are writing for some form of publication (ebook, traditional), I'd say no.

In the end, is it a problem anyway? I think it's wonderful that the written word is getting so much love. I think too, the more people who write, the more appreciation those who do it well receive because joe-public realises how difficult it is.

Istvan Szabo, Ifj. said...

It's true in almost everything, not just in writing. It's because of the time of development. We're writing books for months, sometimes for years. But you can read every novel within days, sometimes within hours. Same applies for tv series, movies and computer games. Time of development = year and above, true time of entertainment = hours.

Reena Jacobs said...

On a whole, I doubt it. There are far more readers out there than writers in the general public. Of the people I know (face-to-face), I know three people other people who write. One is seeking publication, another writes amateur porn for fun, and the last is in the stage where he wants to be a writer, but hasn't made a commitment. There may be others out there who haven't let me in on their little writing secret. But still, three people amongst all I know, really isn't that many... and only one of them serious about writing. Plus, I know the two causal writers are avid readers.

I think because writers often hang with other writers, the numbers seem a bit skewed. Most of the authors I associate online are so busy writing, they don't make time to read. Many who were avid readers say they've cut back so they can write. I think I'm one of the few authors who still reads more than I write.

Matthew MacNish said...

I do currently probably write a bit more than I read, but I would have to write several novels to make up for all the reading I've done in my lifetime. Several long novels.

Mercy Loomis said...

I know quite a few writers. But I know a heck of a lot more people who read than write. (Although I also know a lot of people who "would like to" write but don't, of course.)

Most of the writers I know are also readers. Several of them do book reviews, and probably spend just as much, if not more, time reading than they do writing (not counting blog posts and reviews and Twitter).

I think reading has gotten more portable too. Lots of people read on their phones now, and where they might not always have a physical book with them, they pretty much always have their phone. Plus audiobooks in the car or on the train or while cleaning. I listen to audiobooks at work, which has made it a lot easier for me to keep up with my reading.

And if you want to count blogging and Facebook and Twitter, people probably spend more time reading on those media than they do writing on them. (Most people, anyway.)

Laura Drake said...

Tell me about it. . .my TBR pile is reaching epic proportions.

writerjmk44 said...

I think more people read than write because writing is much harder than reading. However, there are a lot of people who think they can write who cannot. If you can read, you can read.

Lee Ann Sontheimer Murphy said...

As an author (my third novel debuted over Memorial Day weekend) I myself spend far more time writing than reading but that seems to be the lot of an author.

That said, however, since my books have been out I have discovered to my delight that far more people seem to be reading than not, very encouraging for the writers, myself among them.

I think that the ease and spread of e-readers such as the Nook and the Kindle have spurred more people to read.

I have senior citizens reading my books down to kids in high school and everything in between.

I have every level of the social strata reading and commenting to me about my books from servers at the local family restaurant to CEO's and elected government reps.

People ARE reading, more than writing.

Mr. D said...

My reading time is almost exclusively for research regarding my next novel. I've found that time spent reading just for pleasure is time I could have been writing.

Laura Pauling said...

It does take longer to write a book than read a book. So if you are considering just the population of writers, I'd say yes. But if you are going with the population as a whole - I'd say no. But if you'd scale and compare writing vs reading with writers, I'd hope they'd equal out b/c all writers should be reading - a lot!

The Red Angel said...

In the past I used to read A LOT more than I wrote, and actual reading became a form of procrastination for me. Since the summer began though, I've definitely balanced out writing and reading, and invest roughly equal amounts of time for both. And I think that there are definitely more readers than writers in today's society.

~TRA

http://xtheredangelx.blogspot.com

aplaceforwriters said...

Excellent question!
My absolute first instinct was that I write more than I read, in sharp contrast to the time in my life when I worked (retired, now) AND before computers.
However, in thinking, perhaps I am still reading more than writing. The difference is that I'm not reading BOOKS as much. I read nearly all day - articles, blogs, emails, etc.
But, I write, too. I answer the emails, I blog, I'm working on my book.
So, short of stop-watching my day, I'm really not sure whether I'm reading or writing more.
One thing I do know - I'd rather be writing more.
Regards,
Julie

Mister Fweem said...

A writer who doesn't read a lot is a poorer writer, in my book. I spend a lot more time reading than I do writing. I still read for pleasure. I've got three books I'm reading right now. It's part of my percolation process on writing. I'll read for a while, then suddenly a sticky problem with my own writing comes into focus and I'm able to get through it.

Landra said...

It used to be way too much time writing vs. reading for me. Now though I find myself running for a book instead of logging into twitter or working on the story.

Guess I just want to spend a little time getting lost.

Therese said...

Outside of writer-world, the majority of people spend their time reading. I know opticians, accountants, cosmeticians, massage therapists, chefs, nurses, architects and people in many other careers who are avid readers and don't write more than a few texts a day. Even those are only for work.

Outside of writer world, people have lives. Reading is something they enjoy.

Dan said...

For me it goes in waves. I'm about to start writing a novel. While I'm writing it, I probably won't read a lot of fiction, mostly because all my spare time will be dedicated to writing. However, in prep for writing, I spent months reading and re-reading many books. Overall, I've spent more time reading than writing.

Jack Skye said...

I don't think so.

We as writers forget that there are many people who love to get lost in a story but would rather gnaw off their dominant hand than write something themselves.

Barbara Watson said...

I hope there are more readers out there than writers! But yes, as a writer I spend more time writing than reading - now. But spread over my lifetime, I hope reading wins out.

Ted Cross said...

I read a LOT more than I write. I try to finish two books a week, unless one is really long. I sit down to write only after my mind has mulled over everything about a new chapter and I am satisfied with it, so I might not type anything new for a week or two. Sometimes, though, I get the bug and slam out three or four chapters in a week, or when I get close to the end of a book, I generally polish it off really quickly. Still, I always read way more.

Stephanie Faris said...

I work with quite a few women who are voracious readers but never write a word. Mostly they read romance and legal thrillers, though... And they're of the older generations. My niece and stepdaughter both read constantly...the younger generations seem to have not embraced electronic technology yet...and they seem to be more aware of the fact that they can get FREE books from the library than adults are.

1000th.monkey said...

I'm a fast reader, so I tend to take breaks from writing to read... so, I'll take a weekend off and read 3 or 4 books in one go.

In the last 6 weeks I've finished 22 books and will be finished #23 today or tomorrow.

So I definitely take more time to write than read :)

April said...

That is always my delimma, especially when reading a really good book. I love writing, obviously, but I love reading. I'd have to say, I spend much more time reading than writing. I'm ashamed to admit it. If I ever want to get published, I have to write more. A lot more. But for some reason, once I can finally settle down for the evening after the homework and the dinner and bathtime and bedtime and dishes...I just want a glass of wine and a book to take me away. If only I didn't have to work a day job...

Eric said...

I can't say I'm doing more creative writing than reading, but I am doing more writing in general (blogging, writing essays and papers, etc). It's kind of funny, since writing is so much harder than reading and yet we do more of the former than the latter.

Caroline said...

I am definitely writing more than reading right now. Sadly, as I have continued to polish my work and read on the mechanics of writing, I have become very picky in my reading. Three out of five books I pick up just aren't compelling to me. The voice is off, or I don't care for the writing style. I did not used to be so sensitive to these things.
I have begun to wonder if learning more about writing has killed my love for reading. I certainly hope not!

Julia Darcey said...

I think it feels this way for everyone steeped in the writing blogosphere, and particularly for agents who spend their work days surrounded by writers.

But when I remember my "normal" circle of 100 or so friends and family (who are you people again?) I realize that 1 (me) is a writer, while 50-60 are voracious readers. So based on my highly significant anecdotal evidence, I'd say there are far more readers. It just doesn't seem that way on the internet.

Anonymous said...

There are more reading than writing. Trust me on this. With e-readers, people can't wait to buy books and read them on their e-readers. Readers of all ages are now communicating with authors, asking when the next book is being released...even suggesting to authors that certain books would be great as a series. Readers are very excited nowadays and some can't seem to get enough books.

Neurotic Workaholic said...

I used to work in a bookstore, so I know for a fact that there aren't enough readers out there (at least, not enough readers who will pay for books rather than sit in the bookstore for two hours and read for free). The new craze over e-readers, though, gives me hope that more people are going to start reading.

Sommer Leigh said...

I am sure there are lot more people writing than reading, especially since I know several writers (who drive me crazy) who don't read because it takes away from writing time.

I consider reading just as important as writing. I try to read at least one book a week, even if I lose one night of writing time. It is for pleasure but it also makes me a better writer.

Lauren said...

Love the question, but I'm with the reading camp. It may slow me down, but my writing isn't nearly as good when I'm not constantly feeding myself a heavy dose of a wide-range of books.

BTW- just finished The Paris Wife last night by Paula McLain & it's like porn for a voyeurist like me enchanted by the modernist era. Pre-published Hemingway as seen by his first young wife. Love. Also liked Lili Wilkinson's Pink about a teenage girl struggling with sexual identity from earlier this week, and now getting into Karyna McGlynn's award-winning poetry chapbook I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl. I especially need to read a lot of poetry if I want my writing to be tighter.

The Desert Rocks said...

I think if we read other people's blogs that counts for reading.
I love reading novels, the newspaper, bios, even junk mail. Some people read nothing and some people read everything they can get their hands on--turn the cereal box around and read it, what does your coffee cup say? There are more people in the world writing and reading, but the ones who write and don't read anything, drive me nuts!

Kimmel Tippets said...

Writing is more time consuming than reading, so it makes sense that there would be more hours spent writing then reading.

However, as a writer I can say that I spend quite a lot time reading. It gives me much needed breaks and it helps prevent writer's block.

salima said...

Definitely more writing time, for which I feel oddly guilty sometimes, especially if we consider reading our education.:)

L.G.Smith said...

Lately I've been really crunched for reading time. Writing has taken over my days. In a weird way I feel like I'm falling behind on current books because I can't read fast enough. Can't write fast enough either. I need more hours in the day!

Woman said...

LOL!!! Me too! I spend way more time writing than I do reading. But don't get me wrong, when something is good, I sink my teeth right in.

Bethany Elizabeth said...

I definitely write more than I read. Scratch that, I spend more time editing. But summer's coming up, and I will read read read read read!!!

Aimee Bea said...

I definitely spend more time reading than writing. I've been trying to write more; I'm one of those procrastinators...

I think it's the writers that are doing most of the reading in the world. All those normal people out there, or at least the ones I know, they don't seem to read very much. It makes me sad. :(

abc said...

I'm voting for the Reading vs. Writing. Just because I happen to know everything.

D.G. Hudson said...

Great photo, Nathan.

Judging from the many clubs, writing groups, author pages, and blogs -- it would seem that more people are writing. That may be misconstrued due to the self pubbed or indie pubbed selections - something not as easily available in times past (resulting in much more choice & visibility).

Choice is a daunting thing for some people who prefer to choose their books on the advice of reviewers or the stone-cold bastions of taste (you know the ones). I would trust book reviews from a blog more than the ones where many of the reviewers are there only for self-gain (Amazon, etc).

I have a physical stack of books to-be-read and lots of people on this blog have said how big their own TBR stacks are (of course, some are digital).

We live in a reading 'time of plenty', but a lot of those are classics or the old masters of literature. We need new & untried (debut) authors to help cull the hordes of celebrity books which consistently clutter the market. We need NEW voices. So if there are more writers - that's a good thing for readers, not so much for writers.

More writers are turning to other avenues to gain momentum or to satisfy that passion to write. Blogs are a great way to test your wings. For me: I'm writing more, and reading when I can, very selectively.

http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.com/2011/05/rainforest-pickings-5-book-reviews.html

Anonymous said...

I love this question. I spend more time writing simply because writing takes way longer than reading does. Though I do read at least two books a month.

What always shocks me are the people that want to be writers that don't read at all. I mean, isn't that like being a chef who doesn't eat or a seamstress who doesn't wear clothes?

Laur said...

I'm sure if you compared the amount of people talking and listening far more people are talking at any given time. It's a similar comparison.

Zan Marie said...

I'm one who reads more than writes. It's so easy to distract myself from my work with a good book.

cookie said...

I don't know. I read a lot more than I write. Not that everyone else is the same as me. Also, there are definitely more readers than writers.
If it was just constrained to writers, I think it might be equal, considering that some writers read more, while others write more.

Mira said...

Okay, let's look at this logically:

So there are two groups:

a. Don't read, composed of:
1) people who don't read and don't write
2) people who write and don't read


b. Read,composed of:
1) People who read but don't write
2) People who both read and write

Now, there are 6,775,235,700 people in the world.

Unfortuately, I can't give you the number of people who are writing. When you google that, it comes up: Too many people are writing about cricket, which wasn't helpful.

Therefore I will make an educated guess.

Group A, people who don't read at all consists of about five people.

Group B, people who read consists of the rest of the 6,775,235,700 minus five.

Not only that, but with the accessibility of immedicacy of e-books, I think those five will probably be won over soon.

So, there you go. Logical proof!

Mira said...

You know I'm just joking around right? Hope that's okay.

To answer the question, I suspect there are more readers than writers.

Ann Best said...

I've seen statistics lately. I definitely think there are more people writing than reading-- reading books, that is. People write blogs and tweets and emails. It's the way it is today. But there are people who still like to read books, as I'm discovering with my recently released memoir. And each month I buy as many books as I can and review them for the authors.

Elizabeth Fyne said...

It can take years to write a book that can be read in one day. Definitely more time writing than reading.

Jarvis said...

I'd argue there's more writing than reading given America's illiteracy problem and it's texting addiction.

some chick said...

I'm currently spending a lot more time writing right now than I am reading, unless you count reading and re-reading the piece that I'm writing. O_o

Though I usually do a good amount of both. I usually get through one or two books a week.

Debra Lynn Lazar said...

I spend WAY more time writing than reading. My TBR pile is daunting. When I do read, however, I love it and am reminded of the importance of telling a great story.

I need a couple of weeks on a Caribbean island to do nothing but sit in the sun and read.(Don't we all!)

mmshaunakelley said...

Reading is my #1 motivation TO write. When I read something else someone has done well, it makes me want to hop up and write. I've got to say, I read more than I write (which is reflective of my having only finished 2 books in my lifetime), but I hope to correct that.

MJR said...

I'm definitely more of a reader than a writer... When I have nothing to read (a state that makes me feel twitchy and unhappy), I write.

Jo Eberhardt said...

Yes. But I think that it's not only inevitable that there's more time spent writing compared to reading, it's a Good Thing.

When you think about it, who are writers really writing for? Other writers. Consider:

Your average reader will read maybe 4 or 5 novels in a year. Especially now that it's possible to watch TV & movies in non-traditional places (like on buses, beaches, and boardwalks), those numbers may decline further.

Your average writer, on the other hand, may read 4 or 5 novels in a month. Writers are generally more avid readers. Or, put another way, avid readers are much more likely to be (or want to be) writers as well, whether they're writing for fun or profit. Even those avid readers who don't identify themselves as writers often spend hours closeted away writing fanfic or bad poetry. (And that still counts as time spent writing.)

More writing hours spent
= more reading done
= more enjoyment of reading
= more interest in writing
= more writing hours spent

Marilyn Peake said...

I think there are probably more readers than writers in the world, even though a lot of people are writing these days.

When I write, I have difficulty finding time to read, and there are sooooo many books to read these days, I can't ever keep up with my To Be Read purchases. I felt better after finding out the brilliant Umberto Eco's opinion on reading vs. writing: Umberto Eco: 'I'm a writer not a reader'.

Thomas Burchfield said...

Writing time definitely wins with me. What's even more interesting is how being a writer restricts the kind of books you have time to read. I'd happily frolic through the days reading vintage Luke Short western novels or World War II espionage stories, fiction and non- . . . but my next book is set in 1920s Prohibition California, so, as you can guess, my reading inevitably circles around that subject matter. Not to mention, the essays I post on my page also require my reading to go in a different direction.

Elizabeth said...

I was actually in a writer's group with a woman who hated reading books. She admittedly only wanted to write long enough to establish herself as some Patterson-like success, and then she had every intention of turning around "the writing stuff" to a ghostwriter so she could focus on the PR full-time.

This was five years ago, by the way, and I don't know what happened to this person or if her plan for literary domination panned out. It wouldn't surprise me either way. What she lacked in sense she made up for in ambition, that's for sure.

As for me, I consider it a part of the writing gig, so I make time for it, just like I make time for writing. No exceptions. The reading/writing time ratio is something like 1:3, but considering I can read 70 pages in an hour and can only write 1-2 pages an hour, the ratio of books read to books written is way different. Since December, I've drafted 1 book (still editing) and read 65.

J. T. Shea said...

That Botticelli painting shows a true writer. She's obviously run out of ink and is pricking her finger with the quill to write on in her own blood! Or maybe she's an editor and that's how the red pen originated. Oh wait, she's the Madonna. But not that Madonna.

I read more than I write, in terms of wordage but also time. And I'm not that fast a reader. There are probably writers who write faster than I read.

The Pen and Ink Blog said...

I think it's neck and neck

Rebecca Kiel said...

When I start thinking about the number of writers in the world, I remember that the majority of people I know are readers - readers who buy books.

Katherine Hyde said...

I think it only seems like writing time wins because we're immersed in the writing world. When I consider the people I know that I have NOT met in connection with publishing, very few of them are writing books. But most of them are readers.

Reading is a heck of a lot easier than writing, so I think it will always win.

Lynda R Young said...

I think there's still more readers than writers. I also think there's more want-to-be-writers than actual writers. You know the type: 'I have this great book idea...' I also think many writers don't read enough.

Kristin Laughtin said...

If you're getting down to just reading novels (and not blogs, work-related things, news, and so on), it's probably pretty on par most of the time. Certain weeks are busier and I try to devote more time to getting writing done, while other weeks I can't put a book down and read for hours on end.

brianw said...

I know a lot of people who read, a lot of people who talk about writing, and only a few who actually write. Since I became an author, I have spend a lot more time writing than reading, but it would take a heck of a lot of writing to make up for the reading I did prior to the last few years. Either way, its good to know that we will never run out of things to read.

Sheila Cull said...

"Don't look at me," said Nathan. That's so funny.

Writing time wins over here too. Albeit, all of us, are now writing because we love to read. That's why I wish for more time in a day.

I also want success as a writer. Am I bad for admitting that? And because I read, I will write anyway so I think it's okay to want to be more and/or better at it, each day.

J. Burroughs said...

I think perhaps there is a deeper question here: If you take literacy out of the equation and say a writer = a storyteller = a talker and a reader = a listener, are more people talking or listening?

Kathryn Packer Roberts said...

Depends on if you count all the students out there in college, reading boring text. My husband, the lawyer, had to read basically non-stop, until graduation released him from a sort of reading-hell. So, to me, there are a lot of readers out there. Yes, authors and wannabe's like me, write a ton, but I still think we are the exception not the rule.

erica and christy said...

I always felt like there were less writers than readers.

Then I paid attention. :)
erica

Natalie said...

I probably spend more time reading (novels, blogs, e-mails, articles) than writing. I wish I did more novel reading AND novel writing than I do.

Carolyn B said...

It just looks that way to those of us who are deeply immersed in the writing world. I work the Readers Advisory desk in the public library and I see thousands of people coming through here every day who read constantly and never write a jot.

For most folks, even email consists of hitting the forward button. Tweets are often retweets, facebook updates are links.

Someone mentioned that it takes a year to write a novel, but less than a day to read it. Stop to think, one person writing it - many people reading it.

Relax - the readers will always outnumber the writers.

Nancy Lauzon said...

As an author trying to sell books, I sure hope there are more readers, but it seems to me like everybody on the planet is writing these days. Or maybe that's just where my head is.

Nancy
http://nancylauzon.blogspot.com/
The Chick Dick Blog

Carolyn Arnold said...

Personally, I find it very hard to balance writing, with work (day job & a necessity), having time to relax while incorporating the amount of reading time I would prefer in my day.

Tania Dakka said...

When I first stuck my little toe in the writing pond, I found it to be as deep as an ocean; fish all around. Competition for food is fierce. In order to survive, we have to write more than read.

C.Smith said...

That's a difficult question to answer. There has to be a happy medium between writing time and reading time. As a writer, you can't NOT read. I think, on the days when I procrastinate the most, I read more than I write. But then once I'm on a roll, I can write for a week straight with two minute bathroom breaks and four hours' sleep at the most, and not read a thing. Unless I get stuck with a scene, then I tend to go back and reread the last page I wrote....
Gosh, that's a really hard question to answer.

Just Another Day in Paradise said...

CONFESSIONS OF A WORD JUNKIE: Who cares: Words are words you have got to love them. Did you ever think about how many times those writers read those word over and over again. Does that count?

Hollister Ann Grant said...

I love the Botticelli detail.

Oh, more reading than writing. I don't count Tweeting and Facebooking as real writing.

The English Teacher said...

I still read at least 3 or 4 times as much as I write.

Meghan Ward said...

I feel guilty if I'm NOT writing more than I read - but lately I've been on a reading kick, and I love it. It's all those great books that made me want to write in the first place.

Tyson Adams said...

As a society, Western society in particular, we are more literate than we have been in the past. People read and write everyday, even if it is just texting or the like. So more writing is inevitable, but whether it outways reading time, hard to say.

It is quicker to read something than to write it, so given the social media writing, etc, we probably do spend more time writing than reading.

John Barnes said...

Writers spend more time writing, sure. But there are many readers who don't write much or at all, and in aggregate many more readers than writers.

And writers read WEIRDLY.

One more good reason to stay out of workshops; you'll start to play to the weird side of the house.

Gabriel said...

The answer of whether more people write than read, which is people do write more than they read, succinctly explains the death of Poetry and the attitude against reading fiction (gasp! yes, it's true, ask people how many novels they read in a year).

Though, I think with advents of ereaders, there may be a silver lining for fiction at least, because we all Poetry is dead.

Theresa Milstein said...

For me, it depends on what I'm working on. I go through big writing phases and big reading phases. Lately, I've been reading more than writing. But that's because I'm waiting for both beta readers to get back to me before I triage. Plus, I have a cold so I'm too stuffy for creativity.

Don't even ask about social networking. Big time sucker. And I'm not even on Twitter.

De said...

Your question is a good reminder that as writers we should be spending time reading, reading, reading the genre we write. Certainly I could do more, but I find the literary or mainstream novels I read not only inspire me but often provide stunning examples of fabulous technique. How did I end up here? Why was her transition so smooth? Who would ever of thought of using that word or metaphor? It goes on and on. So your question is apt. I suggest our reading time is part our writing time.

Deborah Serravalle said...

Your question is a good reminder that as writers we should be spending time reading, reading, reading the genre we write. Certainly I could do more, but I find the literary or mainstream novels I read not only inspire me but often provide stunning examples of fabulous technique. How did I end up here? Why was her transition so smooth? Who would ever of thought of using that word or metaphor? It goes on and on. So your question is apt. I suggest our reading time is part our writing time.

Ishta Mercurio said...

A lot of the time I spend "writing" isn't at the computer: I mull through whole scenes in my head, then basically transcribe them later when I sit down.

So I think the hours spent writing might outnumber the hours spent reading, but no way are more people writing than reading. Writers are readers, plus all the people out there who aren't writers but are readers. The readers are out there, guys. My son is one of them.

Ulysses said...

I think it's a sad state of affairs, but likely.

Which begs my favorite question: if nobody's reading, who the hole are we writing TO?

Anonymous said...

I support that authors should always be professional with editors and agents, but I would think the same should apply with them towards writers. It is diffently a very hard field to get in for any new writer, but to be treated as though you are a second class citizen, well they are not gods and playing that role is very unappealing. I am for traditional publishing, but I understand why writers prefer self-publishing. This is just an observation from blogs from many authors, editors, and agents. Everyone in the field of writing, should always treat each other with the utmost respect.
I am a published author for children's book series and a mystery thriller. Let's not forget where we came from...the beginning.

E. VERNA TURNER said...

Truth is writing time and reading time needs CONCENTRATION. If you are out of focus you wont be able to have perfect result. Unless if you are gifted on two tasks.

Kyle Mullan said...

I reckon we all sometimes think that we're writing things that will never be read. It's the paranoia speaking! People won't read if there's nothing to read: keep pumping out that writing!

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