Nathan Bransford, Author


Monday, January 17, 2011

Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Let's not forget what this day is about.



"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." - Martin Luther King, Jr.






22 comments:

Falls Apart said...

Truly a great man . . . if only our idol-hungry culture turned its attention from celebrities to people like MLKJ, this country would be a much better place.

Watcher55 said...

The name, Martin Luther King Jr., evokes different reactions from different people (many of them not worth repeating). As a person who grew up in the South, I've heard nearly all of them. The most common, positive, label ascribed to him "civil rights leader". I think even that label is inaccurate because while he was (is, in a sense) that, he was much more. I describe him as an American HUMAN rights leader. I say that because if you listen to his speeches and study his life, you start to understand that he advocated the “American Dream” and his call was for us ALL (white, black, Asian...) to live up to the ideals upon which this great country was founded.

Caitlin said...

I am still in awe of this truly great man. What a wonderful video, thank you for posting it!

Laura Campbell said...

He brings tears to my eyes every time I listen to his speeches. I find it sad children know little of his message. The past is swallowed by their apathy. Coming from a racially diverse background and the South, I hold on to the belief that it won't be long until racism and prejudice are minute problems in our world.

Munk Davis said...

In creation where one's nature neither honors nor forgives.
One says to the other, no man sees my face and lives.

Bob Dylan

Cathi said...

Indeed, a necessary reminder. Thanks for posting.

nutschell said...

Wow. To hear Martin Luther King Junior's words as he said them decades ago gives me chills. Thanks for posting this video.

D.G. Hudson said...

A great man who deserved much better than he received. He was an icon for many people, black and white, and like so many of the American free thinkers, he was dispatched by the idiot gene.

There will always be discrimination of one kind or another until mankind learns that there is no Superior race.

"How many roads must a man walk down. . ." asked Dylan in one of his earlier folk songs. We're still asking that today. And people are still getting shot by others who think differently. A sobering thought.

D.G. Hudson said...

Almost forgot -
@Munk - great quote, and from one musician who has only gotten better as he gets older.

Raquel Byrnes said...

So eloquent and powerful a speaker. I am moved whenever I hear his great speeches and think of what his words cost...and how they changed hearts.
Edge of Your Seat Romance

Leila said...

His words soothe my heart and refresh my hope in mankind's ability to remove the filters of discrimination and learn how to just let each other be.

The incredible integrity, dignity and conviction of this amazing man is an inspiration to us all, and reminds us that every day there is an opportunity to do our bit and tip the scales of justice that tiny bit more back towards the centre, towards balance. Because in balance all things are equal, as are we as human beings, and in balance respect, courtesy and dignity are no longer notions, or idealistic values, but an integral part of the way we live our lives, every day, in harmony.

Pen and Ink said...

Thank you. It was wonderful to listen to him again. I lived in Capetown in 1955. I lived it Atlanta during integration. I went to the U of GA, the year after it was integrated and knew Charlene and Walter.
In the comments I noted Laura and DG Hudson mourned how far we far to go.
I rejoice in how far we have come. We are so much closer to his dream.

Pen and Ink said...

Oops forgot. There is a mid grade book called Tugging String by David Greenberg about the civil rights movement from the perspective od a white boy whose dad was the Lawyer for the NAACP. Very good. http://www.amazon.com/Tugging-String-Growing-During-Rights/dp/0525479678

Chuck H. said...

"How long? Not long!"

My family now includes African, Oriental, Native American and European ancestry. So, Dr. King, one way or another we are coming together. Thanks for helping us get started.

Anonymous said...

I remember the day he was shot, with clarity. A very difficult, confusing time for a lot of people.

Mira said...

Thank you for sharing this Nathan, I hadn't seen this clip before.

Very powerful and inspiring.

Those who lessen injustice by changing people's hearts are true heros in every sense of the word.

A great man, a champion for peace and clarity of heart and mind, all honor is due to Dr. Martin Luther King.

T. Anne said...

I love the quote you chose. Thank you.

T. Anne said...

O.T. Might I suggest a contest to win an ARC of your book?

Peg Brantley said...

As much as there was to love about President Obama's speech the other day in Tucson, here's the concept that had me running for paper and pen: ". . . Expand our moral imaginations."

Thank you for the tribute to Dr. King.

Ghenet said...

Thank you for sharing this.

Rebecca said...

Amen! I am struck by how young he is, and hos intense and powerful his convictions. A true peacemaker.

Meghan Ward said...

Thanks for posting this, Nathan. I've been trying to explain to my 3-year-old all week who Martin Luther King was. I told him he wanted everyone to be happy no matter what color they were - white or black or brown. He said, "What about green? I have a green shirt. I'm green." "Yes, green people, too," I said. Ah, to be 3 again.

On another note, when I click your Contact button, it reroutes me back to your blog. Is your e-mail address still listed somewhere on your site?

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