Nathan Bransford, Author


Sunday, March 2, 2008

How Much Would You Pay for a Dedicated E-Reader?

With nook (yes, no definite article and uncapitalized. That's how you know it's cool!!) arriving on the scene, there are now quite a few e-readers to choose from, and even more questionably named devices arriving imminently.

And though I tease the (whoops! Silly me, using the definite article) nook, it's only because I want one.

Seriously: want.

But how much would you pay for one?

For the purposes of this discussion, let's call our hypothetical e-reader the Wonderbook. The Wonderbook is much like the devices currently on the market: it has e-ink (no eye strain!), 3G wireless, and has a library of hundreds of thousands of titles to choose from, which you can buy for about $9.99. In other words, the only difference between the Wonderbook and the devices currently on the market is that it has a better name.

How much would you pay for the Wonderbook? $50? $100? $150? Nada?

Click through for the poll! If you already own a dedicated e-reader please click the price that's closest to the amount you paid:



Also, if you haven't had your fill of e-reader polls today, Eric at Pimp My Novel is also having a poll about why you haven't bought an e-reader yet. Check it out!






149 comments:

Henry Baum said...

I paid $300 for a Sony e-reader, but that's too expensive. Should be $200 or less. One day.

ann foxlee said...

I voted that I'd accept one as a gift, but the caveat with that is that it would then be shoved into a drawer for until I forget about it, and then in about five years, it would end up being tagged at $10 and being sold in my garage sale to one of the russian moms that buy all the clothes and electronics at my sales...

I didn't see a poll choice for that though.

J. Matthew Saunders said...

I'm happy with my real books, thanks. For me, the difference between a book and an e-book is the same as the difference between cheese and cheese food product.

Lisa Dez said...

I don't own an e-reader mostly because I don't want to shell out the $250 for one. If they were more affordable, (and had a really cool name) I'd think more seriously about it.

Kelly said...

Own a 1st gen Kindle ($400 paid). I'd pay up to $300 to replace it as needed. It doesn't stop me from buying single books in print, I own more books total as a result of having an e-reader.

Tamaryn Tobian said...

To me, an e-reader is no different than an iPod. It holds all my bought media. I can add my own acquired media (ie ripping a local band's CD).

An e-reader does the same thing for books. Stores all my books, and let's me add documents I don't wish to carry or print out.

I can take notes just like I make playlists in iTunes.

So... I wouldn't want to spend anymore on an e-reader than I would on an iPod.

Robin of My Two Blessings said...

I've pre-ordered the nook. Considered all the rest, but this one... I like. However, I wouldn't be willing to pay more than $250 ish for a reader. So, if it had been more expensive, I would have just continued to lust after it, like I did the Kindle. Even when the K came down in price, something stopped me. Then the nook came along. Love at first sight.

tmonkey said...

E-ink does not necessarily mean "no eye strain". You get eye strain from reading printed words on paper. (I have the bad eyes to prove it.) I also think E-ink has a ways to go (color, resolution, refresh rate) before its advantages outweigh its disadvantages (price being the main one).

Ink said...

Henry,

Strangely, the picture of your Sony e-reader looks remarkably like my 1920 Royal typewriter... remarkable.

StrugglingSerpent said...

I checked out the new "nook". It is about $259. OOOh, I like it. It's got colors. I'm thinking about buying one for my son and stepdaughter for Christmas since they like to read and I'm running out of room to store books at my house! Gee, maybe I'll cut out pics and spread them around my house so maybe someone who loves me will buy me one too.

Veronica Barton-Dean said...

Nathan-

The Wal-mart Co-manager in me has to comment on this subject as e-books have been a topic of conversation on this blog. The reader in me is so excited for e-books, because I tear mine up re-reading them, not to mention the space they take up. However, I've heard all sorts of different reactions to the different versions of them. Much like when the IPODS first came out, my customers are a little leary of spending so much money on something that will quickly get better. Of course, a lot of our problem is our electronics associates don't necessarily understand them. When ever there's a question they call me and that's if I'm there. We got the Sony E-reader last year and still have all six that we received. We never even sold one! I hope that with all the press this year we are able to encourage people that these are truly great machines. I myself am doing my part by educating my associates on them, so they can talk about them intelligently.

Jon said...

I suspect that I'll be reading books on my cell phone before anyone puts out a dedicated reader that meets my standards. The Kindle and nook are sort of cool, but way too proprietary and locked down for me. And everyone else is still too expensive and short on features.

It should help once the ebook market figures itself out. I'm not leasing digital books from Amazon at any price. Once there are reasonable ways for authors to make a living without absurd ebook prices, you'll see so many devices for reading that you won't be able to keep up.

Nathan Bransford said...

SZ-

It needs to be cleared before publication, but not necessarily before you find an agent. Bear in mind that the author usually bears the cost of securing that permission.

T. Anne said...

I paid a mint for the Kindle plus the insurance plus the case. Sadly. I love it though and I can testify it had boosted my book reading to astronomical levels. I haven't read this much in years!

Samuel T. Johnston said...

I have an iPhone, which cost about $200 and does lots of other stuff in addition to ebooks. It's always in my pocket, so I can read anywhere I have a moment to spare. Plus, I'm not limited to a single vendor - I can get books from anyone who is willing to put out an app.

Why would I ever buy a unitasker when I can get a very nice multitasker for the same price or less?

Ca.ll.y said...

everyone keeps talking about how the actual book book is dying. I can honestly say, though, that the reason I don't have an e-reader is because of how much money I would spend on books. Amazon is one thing, but to have instant access, on a hand-held, easy portable screen? I'd be broke in a week, even if they are 10$.

Dawn Hullender said...

Nope. Don't want one. Won't buy one. Ever.

I'll keep my real books thank-you-very-much.

I know the future of publishing is moving toward e-readers, but I'll stand here, feet concreted in the ground.

J. Bookman said...

If you can't be just, be arbitrary. I think W. S. Burroughs said something like that.

In the name of arbitrariness, I'd like to say it should pay for itself in a year. If I save $12* per book and buy 12** books per year, I would be willing to pay $144.

*If new releases are $10 instead of $26, that's a savings of $16 per book! But, a digital version has a lower value to me as a consumer who likes to impress people with the sturdiness of my bookshelves made immediately apparent by their overwhelming burden. That, and the fact that prices of printed books may be unable to remain constant, I would re-value the savings at $10-12 dollars per book.

**I probably buy about 12 books per year as a poor college student. I would feel much better paying less for electronic books that I don't want to own the hard copy of (books that are necessary for classes or just to stay current as a reader). But if I think I might like the book (judging by its cover?), I might feel uneasy buying a download of it, afraid of spending MORE money when I decide I want to own it for myself.

So, Nathan, how about THIS idea for a feature unique to the Wonderbook business model: If you buy a digital copy, a significant portion of the money you spent on that should go toward a rebate should you decide to but the printed copy! Oh wait, I forgot it was just a hypothetical device -- drat!

Luc2 said...

I'm more worried about the price of e-books than the readers. Here in the Netherlands the prices of e-books are almost equal to the paper books. I'm going to wait a while.

P.S. Nathan, how much are the Kings rookies worth? Evans is great, and my man Casspi is contributing.

Nathan Bransford said...

luc2-

I was pretty confident that Evans would be good, but Casspi has been a great surprise. Didn't think he'd be so good right away.

Anna Cotton said...

I'd love to have an e-reader so I can quick tripping to the library or use the e-reader on my iPhone; it's very frustrating only getting 2 paragraphs of text at a time.

The larger problem is the electronic versions are too expensive. I have to spend $200-300 on a reader just to pay $10/book. If a Hard Cover release from Barnes and Nobel is $18, why would I pay $200-300 for a reader and $10 for a book? And the paperback release is usually around $10, I can save that $200-300 for something else.

Ink said...

Maybe the Kings need more exploding exercise balls... three in a row? I vote for a jacuzzi accident and an eight-game streak.

Marilyn Peake said...

We have two Kindles in our home, received as Christmas gifts. We love them, especially when traveling. My own books are available on Kindle ... and I discovered today that my own books and the TWISTED TAILS anthologies in which I have short stories published are now available for the Nook! My small press publisher is primarily an eBook publisher, very tech-savvy.

Rowenna said...

I'm torn--I'm not willing to spend much on an e-reader, and I do like retreating to paper after staring at a screen all day at work. But I'm not opposed to them and don't panic about them singlehandedly killing books as we know them.

I have to say, too, that the process of selecting a book is a lot more pleasant for me in the "real" book realm--wandering the library rows or browsing a bookstore has a lot more appeal than clicking through a virtual shopping cart.

Genella deGrey said...

I love my Sony e-reader. No one keeps tabs on what I DL and they can't start tossing out advertising because I'm connected to a particular book seller.

Remember way back when Cable TV promised no ads?
It's only a matter of time.
:)
G.

L... said...

Don't want one. Period. I like paper and ink books. I like to see them on my bookshelf. I like to thumb through them. I like to dog-ear the pages I like. And it isn't a fear of technology - I just don't like the coldness of reading a book on a machine.

Also, in the link you provided on Friday to the Big Think, there is an interview with Sherman Alexie. He laughs at the elitism of the e-readers and asks the question: Do people realize how much $300 is to some people?

Luc2 said...

I hope Casspi can keep it up. The season is still young. But it seems Petrie did another good draft.

On topic, I heard a rumor that Kindle users from Europe have to pay more for the books they download from Amazon than US users. Anybody knows about this?

Amy said...

I spend more than enough time with screens between my computer and the handful of favorite TV shows I need to watch. Why would I want to increase that?

And besides, the phrase "curling up with a good e-reader" does absolutely nothing for me.

Christina Lee said...

I feel like I got mine for free because I bought a $99 iPhone (my new love) and it has a free Kindle for iphone application. I already downloaded and read two books on it (for 9.99 each)! yippee yay!!

Karen said...

I paid $50 for my Sony when they did a "get a Sony card, we'll give you almost enough points to pay for a Reader" promo 2 years ago. It's taken a few dings, and I'd like to replace it, but not enough to pay more than $100 for a new one.

Julia said...

I'm worried that the formats of the ebooks will not work with newer versions of whatever reader you own. Anyone remember Beta-Max VCRs?

The difference between the iPod and an eReader is that the formats for the iPod were industry standard. The device was designed for what already there.

I just blogged on this today!

Tere Kirkland said...

I would love to receive one as a gift, but that said, I have more important things to shell out about $300 on. So I don't foresee buying one unless they're around $100 bucks and all the bugs are worked out.

I will still buy real books, too, of course. I like the smell, and I'd rather not take my nook or Kindle in the bathtub with me, which is where I get a lot of pleasure reading done.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: it's mostly the price of the e-reader that's keeping the e-book from becoming the "new" way of reading. The bourgeoisie can't afford e-readers yet, but when they can, look out!

Lori B said...

I have too much to carry around with me as it is. My phone is fine for reading books/listening to mp3/etc. I even wrote 200 pages of my first ms on my phone. I'm starting to carry a netbook when I know I'll have time to write, why carry something else with such limited functionality?

John said...

I think the prices for a dedicated reader are pretty ridiculous. As an IT director, I do a lot of bleeding edge technology testing.

If you're going to spend so much on a reader, why not buy a netbook? You can purchase an 8.9" Asus netbook for $200 or so, and use it to browse the internet, type letters, write your masterpizza, etc.

You can also use e-reading software to read books from various sources as well.

I have nothing against reading ebooks, and would probably prefer to do that for the vast majority of books that I buy if for no other reason than to save space. Aside from literary books I read, most of them are over and done with in the space of a few hours.

But $10 for an ebook? That's also crazy. Someone posted how much an author sold his books for in an experiment and the ones he sold for $1.99 obviously sold far better and actually netted him far more profit.

There's no way in hell I'm spending $10 with virtually no overhead, not unless the authors are actually seeing far more in royalties from it.

Word verification: redho (I guess she got a sunburn standing on the corner too long)

Anonymous said...

After all my saying I'd never give up my old fashioned books . . . I was given a Kindle! I use it mostly for quick web research, but it is a lot of fun. I wouldn't entirely give up books, but I am enjoying it.

SZ said...

Nathan, thank you for your response from yesterday !

As for the e reading, we are evolving so fast, with televisions, computers, blackberrys . . . Then there is "lets have less trash" ... One unit is going to encompass all soon, and then we will be paying to add chips to the one unit.

Is my thinking anywho.

Like all electronics, they start high and end low. You pay a high price to have it first.

Stephanie L. McGee said...

I don't care what they say about the technology. I can only stand so much time reading a computer screen before my eyes give out. I want to get lost in a book and that's simply not possible for me with an e-reader. That's why I clicked "You'd have to pay me."

And you'd have to pay me a lot. Like more than J.K. Rowling earned combined with the Queen of England's income.

That and I just would rather hold the book in my hands. Nothing beats new book smell.

Amalia T. said...

Considering the fact that the only reason I have an mp3 player is because I won it as a door prize, and still find myself preferring my CD player... Well, the technology needs to take a significant price drop before I'm going to shell out. When my little (free) iPod dies, I won't be buying a new one of those until THEY drop in price too. Yowza.

But I'm kind of cheap, and only get the cell phone that I can upgrade to for Free with my contract, also. If the day comes that you can get a free e-reader with a subscription to... some magazine or some bookstore vendor, for a reasonable monthly fee, and NOT lose the books I downloaded when the contract is up, I'll start thinking about it.

But why am I going to put out 200 bucks (or more) for a device so that I can then pay a premium price for the e-book content on top of that? And by premium, I mean, Pricier than the good old fashioned paperback I know and love. I mean, with a mass market, I get the content, AND the device with which to read it (paper) for one low 7.99 price point. Sure it takes up shelf space (and my shelves are overflowing) but I love being able to glance over my books and see the titles, and say "hmmm...what do I want to read today?"

E-readers will never give me that. If I have to scroll, it's not a glance, and if it's black and white, it just isn't the same as titled spines peaking out at me en masse.

Now. Everything I just said might change drastically if Comic Book companies get in on the mix, and we have a full color e-reader to support electronic subscriptions to Superman and The Avengers. But the price point is still going to need to drop tremendously to get me there.

onefinemess said...

I think I'd pay about $100 BUT I don't think I'd pay $10 for e-books. $5 yes, $10 no.

It's just not worth it for something I can't sit on my shelf. With enough patience, I can get almost anything I want for my shelf for $10-15, I just couldn't justify that for something non-physical.

It's the same problem I have with buying digital music: $10 or .99 a track is a ripoff. $5 is, again, the magic price point.

C.S. Gomez said...

I don't want any kind of e-reader at all. Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I'm not a huge fan of reading a screen (he said as he updated the blog for his first novel). I just find the sight of my library on the shelves, the rows of books that I can take down and leaf through and actually hold in my hands, to be more inspiring to my creativity than a piece of technology that will be out of date in seven months or so.

So yeah, you'd have to pay me to accept the Wonderbook. But your money would probably be wasted anyway. :)

Scott said...

I said $50, but that was actually pushing it. More like $35. I rarely spend more than that on books in a year, and in a year, it'll either have broken or something else will come along to make it worth under $10.

ella144 said...

I want nook, too, (*snort* that just sounds dirty) but I don't want to pay that much for a dedicated device.

Now I might consider paying that much for an e-reader/internet/mp3 player/video/ . . . wait, I have one of those. It's my laptop! :)

but I still wants nook. *sigh*

Anonymous said...

I voted that I would accept it as a gift. But honestly, I don't know how much I would use one even then. When you consider how much more the cost of a book for an e-reader is in comparison to a paperback...and then add in the fact that it would be much more difficult to share books with my siblings, as I tend to do...I just don't believe I would buy very many books that way. It is simply not appealing to me.

ryan field said...

I like reading digital books on my phone.

But I do think that e-readers are too expensive, so I clicked 100.00, which I think is a fair price.

Susan Quinn said...

I would spend $100 to get one for my mom for Christmas - cheap enough that I won't worry about the tech obsoleting.

For myself, I think I would wait. Then again, if Mom likes it . . .

Guess I probably shouldn't use my mother as a guinea pig.

Wordver: retsions - the reasons I'm reticent to buy the Wonderbook.

Mira said...

Well, it's on my I-phone - right? Is there any benefit to getting another type?

Assuming not, I paid 99 bucks and with that, I got the whole I-phone, a thing of great beauty.

I also discovered another use for the I-phone, aside from all the incredible apps. Flashlight. My power went out, and guess what I used to find my way around. Trusty old I-phone. Then I read a book on it until the power went on.

Really can't beat that.

Andrew said...

My dad has offered to gift me a Kindle three times now and I've passed each time. With the DRM issues, the pricing problems in the publishing industry, and what's shaping up to be an e-reader platform war between various content distributors, it seems like a good time to pay a little extra for paper books and wait out the fighting.

I do use an e-reader app on my iPhone for reading books that are out of copyright though. Best thing since sliced bread.

Meghan Ward said...

I'd pay up to $300, and I want a nook, too, but I'm hesitant with the tablet PCs on the horizon. Nooks can't play video books (Vooks), and I think they're going to gain in popularity. On a tablet PC you could at least view them in a browser. And yet, maybe the next generation of nooks will have video?

Jenn said...

Ebooks . . . you know they've arrived when parents start buying them for their children instead of traditional books. I get the impression that people still spend a great deal more on their kids' books than they do on their own, in the same way that people spend more on their kids' food, transportation, housing and entertainment . . . (check out data from the survey of consumer spending--jumps disproportionately when there's a person in the household under 18). Parents are going to balk at spending more than $50 for a highly delicate machine just so their kids can experience reading in a new way.

Bane of Anubis said...

The lack of Word .doc support bothers me. Would also like greater cross app functionality -- the primary benefit of this thing, as I see it, is its portability, but I don't want to be stuck carrying around multiple PDA type devices...

My Wonderbook would be a bit more wonderful than the little nooky.

Andrew the author said...

Forgive me for my lack of knowledge, but how do e-readers work with libraries? My trepidation is that my discretionary budget is very limited. I buy some authors right away because I can't stand to be number 120 on an on-hold list, but can't support my voracious reading habits through purchases alone.

So, do these e-readers allow poor library bookworms like myself to check out books, or are the e-books a proprietary format that can only be purchased?

Anonymous said...

Veronica Barton-Dean --

Maybe Walmart should stop blowing out books before hammering out the details on e-readers. Priorities, and such. Or do they plan on selling e-books at 99 cents?

Nathan Bransford said...

Andrew-

Sony has a program worked out with some libraries where you can "check out" e-books from the library and check them back in when you're done.

Emily White said...

It might be nice to own one. I certainly wouldn't pay for one, but I'd use it if I got one for Christmas or my birthday. I can see it's appeal. It would be very convenient for traveling, but in all other situations, I like the feel of a book in my hands and I just can't imagine ever giving that up completely.

Meghan Ward said...

P.S. Nathan, I'm curious to know what blog polling software you use. I had trouble finding the results of Pimp My Novel's poll because of all the Google ads at the top.

dcamardo said...

I don't know, even $50 dollars can give you about 9 paperbacks, where with the Wonderbook, I haven't even bought a book to read yet.

Susan at Stony River said...

I'd love one, but can't come close to affording it. My house would certainly be tidier.

Ideally one of my richer relatives will get one as a gift this Christmas, and eventually pass it off to me after losing interest. I hope hope hope hope hope...

Snarky Cupcakes said...

Got a Kindle the first Christmas they were available -- about $250. A gift to me from my then-boyfriend, now hubby, who uses it more than I do.

It's great, really. I still like books better, but the convenience in carrying, price (of the books via Kindle) and instant gratification make it wonderful to have.

Another tool in the reader's satchel.

I wonder how the "digital generation" feels about them? Differently than folks like me, over 50?

Also, as the boomers age, the ability to enlarge the type will be huge. HUGE! Ha! I made a funny.

sex scenes at starbucks said...

Considering I (and many others) spent 250+ for a phone, I don't think 150 is too much to ask. Right now. As competition grows the price should drop. Thing is, I see it not as "dedicated" but able to do lots of media as the definition of "novel" grows to include multi-media works.

sex scenes at starbucks said...

BTW, I'm happy with the .99 price point for single tracks, and short stories, too.

Ulysses said...

I think I'd buy one in the $50-$100 range. It's convenient, yes, but at a higher price point, the overhead it's adding to my book purchases becomes problematic.

The chief thing that worries me about these devices is obsolescence. I have a couple of '45s (records, not firearms), a double-handful of vinyl albums and enough cassette tapes to mummify an elephant. Finding devices to play these things is becoming an impossible task. Formats have changed, and the music I enjoyed in my youth is lost to me unless I go out and re-purchase the same music in a new format. Unfortunately, much of it is no longer available.

This is what will happen with e-readers. Format changes, hardware upgrades, and the gradual obsolescence of reading material.

My favorite book as a child was the Poky Little Puppy. I read the same book (somewhat worn) to my daughter now, and I can do that because the book's format is still compatible with my eyes. If that book were electronic, and e-readers subject to the same format whims as music players, it's unlikely I'd have this pleasure. Likewise, the book that inspired me as a child was the anthology "Way Out." It's no longer in print, but I still have my copy (coverless now and yellow). I can still read it. Were it electronic, I'd be unable to read it because the format would be over thirty years out of date and the file no longer commercially available.

Joseph L. Selby said...

I picked $150 because that's the price I would like to pay. In 19 days, I'm going to pay $250 (possibly more if I determine the extended warranty is worthwhile).

JaxPop said...

Have been away from home for 6 weeks with 2 weeks to go. E Reader would have been great - Brought 4 new books with me & purchased 13 more since arriving (only one left to read). So I'll end up packing at least 20 books for the return trip. On the road - would make sense but gimme the paper version at home. I'll need to check one out in person.

Anonymous said...

nook is getting there as far as digital text presentation is concerned. It's got features that imitate book presentation more closely than what's come before. But price-wise and proprietary format-wise and technology-wise it's still in the realm of early adapters stage as are all e-readers to date.

They're like the 8-track tapes from the dawn of the me generation, the Betamax of the same era, the DiscoVision LaserDisc, the early cell phone data modems of recent times. Momentary, but prematurely released advances in technology. I'll wait for the next generation evolution that surpasses books by improving on my reading experience rather than imperfectly imitating how I currently read.

Vacuum Queen said...

I voted "gift" because as much as I'd like one, I just KNOW that the second I pay big cash, there will be a bigger, better, cooler one that I'll NEEEED! And really, until there's one with EVERYTHING I want, I think I'll just drool from the sidelines.

Donna Hole said...

Yes, I've been looking around myself, and have decided the nook is definitely the one for me. Mostly, I like the size. I don't relish reading on a screen about as small as my cell phone, but I like that the nook can easily fit in my purse.

$200 doesn't seem unreasonable to me for the technology being offered. Really, how much did you pay for your iPhone?

Anonymous said...

I'd take one as a gift, but I refuse to pay for something to read books with and still pay for the books too. That feels weird.

Also won't it be funny if some publishers only put their books on kindle and some only put their books on nook?

Incidentally, if a book costs $10. $4 goes to the bookshop. (e-books don't need that). $3 goes to distribution and warehousing. (ebooks don't need that). $2 goes to print costs, etc (ebooks don't need that) $0.50 goes to the publisher and the same to the author.

I don't expect to pay more than $1.

These figures are just examples, not real.

Diana said...

Even if someone gave me one, I wouldn't use it. Reading text on a computer screen for long periods of time bothers my eyes.

If I go to a website that has a lot of text and very little white space around it, I'll move on to something else.

Even cruising the blogosphere, if there is a lot of text and little white space, I'll move on unless the post really engages my attention.

Matilda McCloud said...

Great point, Ulysses. I saved important stuff on floppy disks and now it's pretty much lost forever. Our VHS tapes are so faded and scratchy, we can't watch them anymore. But our 1928 copy of THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS is as fine as ever.

Mira said...

Meghan, I don't know if Nathan uses this, but blogger comes with a poll 'gadget' that's ad free. Easy to use and set up. I'm not sure what Eric is using.

Donna - I paid 99 bucks for my I-phone (3g, oldest version), plus the monthly service fee which starts at 70.

Mariel said...

Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I like actual books.

Steve Ulfelder said...

I bought a Kindle2 at whatever the going price was - $250 or $300? Call me moderately disappointed. I love it for fiction, but for beefy NF with endnotes, maps/illos/pix, etc., the Kindle2 doesn't cut it; the device leaves me with an unanchored feeling.

I'm back to hardcopy nonfiction and bookshelves that are filling up (again) too quickly.

Wilkie said...

I'd accept one as a gift. Or take one if I were paid to, but I don't know how much I'd use it. I use my laptop pretty much all day for work. I also use it for pleasure when surfing the net for entertainment or new info. But it's not something I enjoy for prolonged reading, and I would hate the feeling of electronic technology being attached to my hip- my laptop, my cell phone, now books converted, too??? For those who love their e-readers, that's great, it sounds like a very convenient technology. But I know I'm not alone in enjoying my bound paper books either.

Marty Ison said...

I would pay $99 for a “wonderbook”, the same price as my iPhone.

That said, I will never buy an e-reader or content from an e-store that uses a proprietary platform. The purpose of DRM is to manage and protect digital rights. These online retailers have effectively made themselves an owner of the rights I purchase. Look for a class action suit against Amazon et al.

Even iTunes allows download to any compatible MP3 player. Because Apple knows it’s impossible to sustain proprietary rights to purchased property. That’s why iTunes is free software while the iPod and iPhone have patented features.

I would agree with ULYSSES about obsolescence. To anyone buying a Kindle® or nook®, well, I have two things to say: Betamax and HD-DVD.

If you need an e-reader now, then buy one. But if you can wait six months to a year you’ll be able to buy an e-reader that will work with books bought from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or any other electronic store.

Hey, but I could be wrong...NOT.

steveb said...

I'd like a Wonderbook for the books I read for fun, but I'd still like printed books for my research-related books (although an electronic search function would be interestingly convenient), which includes books that become my literary classics.

Still, any more than $200 would require some soul-searching of "do I really need this?"

Courtney Price said...

Gosh, that nook looks pretty cool... it looks like something that I might want, which means I'll have to take back all that "cold dead hands" stuff I've spouted...

GhostFolk.com said...

Okay, now we're talking.

I'd go $1,250 if I could cable it to my flat-screen hd TV and split-screen the book alongside whatever is on the tube. That way I could read and watch TV at the same time without having to constantly look up and down, through and then over my reading glasses.

Wow, a book with closed captioning. Now that's a Wonderbook.

Next up, teleprompter-screen car windshields. I am so tired of the back of that semi, anyway!

Nikki Hootman said...

The price of the reader is not what keeps me from getting one; it's the price of the books offered on the reader. Until they are significantly lower than print editions, I'm not buying.

dOgBOi said...

I have a first generation Kindle, and while I love it, I won't buy another e-reader until a few things happen.

1) It becomes easier to move my books from one device to another. Like my music, I want DRM free books that I can use on every device I own, and any future device I might own. I don't want my books locked down to one device.

2) Multi-column landscape views, for newspapers and magazines.

3) Color E-Ink for pictures

4) Faster page rendering

GhostFolk.com said...

Okay, now I want book goggles. Sunglasses style preferred for beach reads and maybe a flip down sleep-mask book reader for rides on airplanes.

That light the you stare at when you are in the dentist's chair... it could hold a book, couldn't it? Readers Digest Condensed to keep pace with the Muzak?

ann foxlee said...

Ulysses has put his finger on exactly why I am uncomfortable with electronic books.

I have every book my mom ever read me, complete with my 'artistic' drawings on some of the pages. And I don't think the kindle or nook will ever be able to replicate that old book smell that instantly makes me smile.

Besides, if I wanted to read a modern book that I didn't care about keeping, I'd rather download it to an iphone or to my mini-netbook than have yet another device jangling around my purse.
I can see them being very useful for book industry folks (agents, editors, etc.), since they are reading all day long, but for me... kinda useless.

GhostFolk.com said...

Anonymous 12:22

Or by a TV and pay for cable?

I'd take one as a gift, but I refuse to pay for something to read books with and still pay for the books too. That feels weird.

Paul Neuhardt said...

I can't decide. Part of me wants the physical book because of the feel, the smell, the joy of turning a physical page.

But part of me wants to feel all Jean-Luc Picardish and have books on a little pad that I can read at will just by turning it on, a pad that will mysteriously suck books out of the cosmos and display them to me at my command.

And then there is the geek in me that just wants a cool gadget.

Two out of three inner personalities probably win in the end, but not yet. All of my inner voices are broke. So if anyone would like to lob one at me as a gift...

Kelly Bryson said...

My library card was free. I'm super cheap, I guess.

But I don't read library ebooks on my computer either. Why would I?

I get terribly annoyed with the way ipod and MP3s won't stay in the same room. I listen to my husband's ipod, but I won't put that software on my computer, thankyouverymuch. I'm leary of ereaders, like so many other commentors.

Bron said...

I think the problem most people have with the price isn't the price itself, but the lack of functionality. As others have pointed out, they paid as much as an e-reader costs for phones. The difference is phones now come with a lot of functions. But that's not to say e-readers won't one day - remember when phones just made calls?

Maybe e-reader retailers need to look to the pricing scheme of phones. You could buy an e-reader on a plan and pay one monthly rate that goes towards paying off the device, and also allows you, say, two free eBook downloads a month.

Mary said...

I happily read on my iPhone. It's always with me, and can be whipped out when I have an opportunity to read but don't have a book in my bag.

But when reading at home, I love physical books. A solid, hard electronic device is something I associate too much with work. So, until I see a high performance e-reader I respond to in a tactile, personal way ... I'll stick to reading e-books on my phone. :)

Shelby said...

You'd have to pay me. I want to hold the book in my hand and feel the spine of it and turn the pages myself. And loan it out to a friend if I want to. I want a bookshelf full of books lining my walls.

I don't want words on a screen to pass on to my grandkids.

Gordon Jerome said...

I consider it brutish these days to have to read a book. Even when I get Stephen King's newest that I preordered for the first edition hardback as a collector's thing, I won't read it. I'll buy it again on Kindle and read it on Kindle.

This holdover for books is ridiculous, and I don't even have to argue it: fiction is going Kindle and/or nook. Right now, the market works with books and treats e-books similar, but in the near future, Amazon is going to have to do something to gain exclusivity to publishers and authors over Barnes and Noble.

Everyone likes to rebel: "I WONT EVER OWN ONE!" I'm old enough to remember that same shtick about albums over CDs. It's going to happen. Get on board and start looking at what it means to be a fiction writer in an e-age.

Karla said...

The options for buying an e-reader in Canada are limited. No Kindle, no Nook, and the Wonderbook probably won't be available here either ;)

I have a cheapie cell phone, an even cheaper mp3 player, and a refurbished computer, but I bought a hideously priced Sony and I love it. No regrets. I buy more books than ever and read more than I did before. Love it.

Liana Brooks said...

I'm not paying for one unless it comes with a stylus that I can take notes with and I can download word documents from my computer onto it. At the very least.

If it's just for books, it needs to be a cheaper format than a book. If I have to pay for the reader AND pay for the book (sometimes $20 or more) there's no reason to give up the paperback format.

It has to be more than an electronic book if you want me to fork over cash.

Dara said...

I'd pay $150, BUT there needs to be the capability to use the device to get eBooks from the library on it. That's the only way I'd ever consider one.

Then I wouldn't have to worry about those pesky late fines or losing one of the books amongst the mess that is my computer room :P

Jourdan Alexandra said...

I understand the concept of the e-reader: It's compact, lightweight, and can store many, many books. It's perfect for traveling, or for someone who is constantly on the go. I know that Kristen Nelson uses her Kindle to read sample pages, so obviously it's a great tool for agents.
Nonetheless, I have a huge problem with it.
It seems that as the e-reader becomes more and more popular the less important books become. I've read things that prophesize that physical books will be gone in the next ten years, and that the e-reader will be will be the primary medium that people use to read.
The thought that the physical, tangible written word will disappear terrifies me. I don't like it, at all. And I can't understand why someone wouldn't want to actually hold the book, smell it, run their fingers across the raised print. I have books that I've loved for years and years, some of which are over a decade old. You can't get that from a lousy e-reader.
In conclusion, I voted for "Accept as a gift, but I ain't payin". The e-reader is a nice tool to have, but it better NOT be the future of the literary world.

Paula B. said...

It's not the price of the ereader, Nathan. It's all those books you have to buy for it.

We have a house full of thousands of books that represent a huge investment. Now we're supposed to start buying many thousands of dollars' worth more? Sorry. Can't afford it.

--Deb said...

I'd love an ebook reader if they were more reasonably priced. I've tried out the Kindle app for my iPod and like it (minus the eyestrain), and would certainly consider electronic versions of books that I know I'm only going to read one time. But, especially in this economy, $250 for a one-trick pony is too much. (Hence the iPod thing.)

Marva said...

It's got to be a reader that accepts open source formats, e.g., PDF, MOBI, HTML, EPUB.

A big reason I'm not too hot on a Kindle is that you're stuck with those over-priced $9.99 books in a proprietary format. Sorry, but I am not convinced that publishers are "losing" money by selling ebooks for $9.99.

I know a bunch of good books for sale on Amazon for Kindle for less than $2.00. Boo hoo, they're not Brown, Grisham, King, Rowley, or (blech) Palin. Still, they're darned good books a poor schlub can afford.

I'd pay $199 for a reader just to match the $1.99 on a ton of great books available at that price.

Veronica Barton-Dean said...

Anonymous-

I was simple stating the fact that the regular population still don't know that much about the e-readers, but our associates tend to be the same way. People don't want to purchase something that's expensive and that they don't understand.

What home office chooses to do for pricing of any product, is not up to the every day joes that simply run their stores. Just because I work for them doesn't mean I agree with the things they necessarily do in those terms. I was merely using my professional experience to shed some light on what I've heard from different customers about the products.

AM Riley said...

The only thing holding me back was the specter of a row of digital devices cluttering up my desk. MP3 player, phone, bluetooth device, and now an ebook reader?

Today I bought a 'Droid'. It has an ereader in it !for free!. I just downloaded 'The Tempest' and one of my own books. They look great. I'm sold. And all I'm paying for is a 'smart' phone.

B.J. Anderson said...

I just bought a Kindle and I love it. I read way more than usual, and I impulse buy books I normally wouldn't have purchased. Plus, I can read it in the mornings while I'm curling my hair (although, I did just about burn a piece off today). It is totally worth the money.

Anonymous said...

"Everyone likes to rebel: "I WONT EVER OWN ONE!" I'm old enough to remember that same shtick about albums over CDs. It's going to happen. Get on board and start looking at what it means to be a fiction writer in an e-age."

I'm old enough to remember when they said that about radio over TV. "It will never last."

I'm also not too old to own and use an e-reader. And I'd never go back to books.

Anaquana said...

I don't even own an Ipod or other MP3 player, so I doubt that I would ever buy an e-reader.

I just hate the idea of having to buy a specific device in order to read books that I then have to purchase as well.

No thanks. Not when I can pay once for a printed book.

And if I run out of space, I can just donate the books I no longer read to my local library. Or ship them off to a friend who owns a used book store.

Ben-M said...

What I really want is something simpler than the current early-adopter-overloaded-with-features garbage. Seriously, for some of us folks, less is more.

Drop all the wireless, or make it optional via a usb dongle. I don't want no fancy colour screens or mp3 players neither. So what do I want?

Just the ability to read text using eink, and annotate that text, then export what I've worked on.

I don't see myself in the same market demographic being targeted by the Kindle or nook. I imagine there's an untapped market out there for an educator's product.

One needing a product suitable for reading and marking essays and tests, suitable for starving writers to crit fiction, and suitable for the stretched budget of both.

That, I'd buy.

Hannah Jenny said...

You really would have to pay me. I like paper. I like different books having a different size, shape, feel, even smell. I like old books and the history that comes with them, even if I don't know the history. And I don't like looking at screens. I'm only reluctantly on the mp3 player bandwagon, because it's a lot more convenient than carrying all my CDs around or only being able to listen to them when I'm home, but you know what? I only need to have one or two books with me at a time for leisure reading, and I'm pretty sure I'll keep that up.

Anonymous said...

I like the idea of e-readers, and I am admittedly a "Gadget Girl". My objections to them are mainly cost. After all, I downloaded the Amazon and B&N apps on my iphone for free and have pretty much the same experience as an e-reader. The screen may be a little bigger, but it is still one more thing to carry. My other concern is the proprietary nature of them - If I am going to pay more for a single purpose item like a reader than I did for my mini-laptop, I want it to be able to read more than just one store's offerings.

Carolyn B said...

I never thought I would want an e-reader until I bought a Kindle for my son for his birthday. I thought I should set it up, get a few books on it before I gave it to him. By the end of the first session, I was hooked. The convenience is mind-blowing! Free classics, instant access to any book I want, plus the whole library fits in my purse. As for eyestrain - I can make the print bigger, or even have books read out loud to me. Hey - I'm a librarian. I LOVE real books, the way they feel, and look, and smell.. But trust me, this is the future of publishing. I don't see real (paper) books disappearing overnight, but e-books will get cheaper and more widespread, as electronic devices always do.

Carolyn B said...

I noticed some of the comments were about the problem of being "stuck" with proprietary formats. That just doesn't happen with the Kindle. I download from several sites that have nothing to do with Amazon but still offer books in a format Kindle can read. Thousands are free or 99 cents.

karen wester newton said...

It sounds like a lot of commenters are quite sure they don't want an eReader but have never seen one. They don't seem to knw about e-ink screens. I love my Kindle 2 even more than I loved my Kindle 1 (now my husband's Kindle). We paid $309 for the K1 (thanks, Oprah!) and $299 for the K2. I have read probably 3 to 4 times more books per year since we got the first Kindle. eReaders have their limitations, especially for children's books or anything else that needs color, but if you're reading a good novel, after a while you forget you're reading on a Kindle. If you don't, the story's not very compelling.

I'm glad the Nook (I refuse to write it lower case) will be in stores, along with the new QUE document reader, because then people will be able to see them. I think Amazon could have sold more Kindles if people could have held them first.

nicole said...

I agree karen. Maybe this is part of the problem. I don't necessarily mind people being against e-readers. But I'm disturbed that some of the reasons being provided for not wanting one aren't exactly founded in truth. e-ink is not like reading a traditional computer screen and therefore comparing it to reading a computer screen for hours probably isn't the best argument out there.

to address the original question, I don't mind paying about $250 for the device itself. I am more wary of the prices of e-books themselves. I'm OK with the $9.99 price point for the most part (though this too has problems) The real problem for mewhen I come upon an ebook that costs the same as the current hardcover that's out. Why would I pay the same amount for an ebook as I would for a hardcover book? That's ludicrous.

I really like the nook though (I actually work at a Barnes & Noble and can't bring myself to say the word without the article in front of it, sorry). But a working model is not available at my store yet and I'd like to play with it a bit before committing to buying :)

globalgal said...

I don't think anyone has mentioned the reason that I am pro-ebook and e-readers. I am an American living in a small city in China. I have no access to English language books (and no library) so purchasing audiobooks and ebooks is really the only way for me to get access to books. I do purchase books on my once a year trip to the US, but they are heavy and take up so much of my 20kg luggage allowance, it is a real luxury. Having books shipped to me is a disaster. Inefficient local delivery system means they never arrive.

I currently read all ebooks on my laptop, but I would love the convenience of a dedicated e-reader I could carry more easily. I prefer the nook over the Kindle because of the formats it will accept.

julieT said...

I'm not understanding why so many are hatin' on the e-book thing. I own one myself and I can honestly say it will never take the place of a "real" book. However...it does serve a purpose. I love the convenience of always having something to read in a nifty, cool, little, gadget.
For me, there are books I will read on the reader, usually the reading I do for entertainment, especially on the road.
But when I'm doing more serious reading, I have to have the real McCoy. Nothing will or could ever take the place of a real book for the serious literary-type. But the e-book thing is here to stay...they're already starting to infiltrate our schools! Dear God, what is the world coming to?! Seriously, everyone needs to relax. It doesn't make you smarter or more of a "real" writer or something just because you claim you'll never be seen dead with an e-book whatchamacallit. Lighten up.I'd be willing to bet that most of the e-book haters are major twitter-tweeters/facebook/iPod junkies dying to secretly get their hands on anything that's gadgety...even an e-book.

Thermocline said...

I say I'd never want one but then I haven't had a reader in my hot little mitts. Maybe I'd like it. I just haven't had enough interest to check one out.

Tina Lynn said...

I'm waiting for that one that beams the story into your brain.

shorty411 said...

Haha, that's right. Just nook :) I probably won't get a dedicated e-reader. I'm waiting for the all in one, perhaps an apple tablet anyone?

Nick F. said...

Went with the final option. While I admit the nook is the most appealing of them all, the day I use any e-reader is the day we all live in Ray Bradbury's mind. Ink on paper or nothing at all.

Caroline Steele said...

I'd pay $250. If I had that much money, anyway. Since I don't, I haven't bought an e-reader. Alas.

Literary Cowgirl said...

I think I will have to do more research on what kind of royalties authors get from electronic sales. I've heard it is less than for print, but haven't seen any stats. If that's the case, I'm sticking to my real books. I would love it if anyone had some info to share.

Kristin Laughtin said...

Honestly, it would depend a lot on what I could do with the books I purchase. Would the reader allow me to share them? Transfer them to another device if a better model came out? What if my reader broke? Would I lose all my books? I'd be willing to pay more for a device if I was sure I wouldn't lose my books in any of those situations.

I really do like the idea of e-readers but I'm one of those people who want to wait for the technology to mature before investing. Then I'd maybe pay up to $200, although I'd be a lot happier around the $100 price point.

Karen McQ. said...

I have a Kindle and paid $259 for it. It's not the same as a book, I agree, but I love it for the ease and convenience of sampling and buying books from the comfort of my home. And I'll echo what others have said about the eInk technology not causing eye strain. Part of my affection for my Kindle may have to do with the fact that I'm a self-published Kindle author who's enjoying good sales. I'm thrilled that my novels are out in the world reaching enthusiastic readers. Ebooks have advantages for readers and writers.

Dominique said...

I'm not gonna lie, I kind of want one. But not so much that I'd lay money on the table for it.

Mira said...

Literary Cowgirl, this is my understanding on the royalties.

Traditional publishing:

A good deal from a publisher will get you 10% royalties. 15% of that goes to your agent.

So, on a $25 hardback, you make 2.50 - 15% = $2.13

On a 6.99 paperback, you make
69 cents - 15% = about 58 cents.

E-books:

Amazon pays the author 40%.

That means on a 9.99 e-book, you make 3.99.

You keep all of that, since there are no agents involved in e-books yet, as far as I know. This will undoubtedly change because the need for agents will increase as e-readers gain legitimacy.

So, the author makes more on e-books in royalites. The downside is:

a. no advance
b. limited distribution. You could potentially sell more copies in bookstores, than you could with e-readers because not everyone has them.

Of course, all of this may change. Percentages may go up and down, etc., but my understanding is this. I hope someone will correct me if I'm wrong.

My perspective: In the long run, e-readers give authors much more control, and a much higher percentage of the profit. As they gain popularity, the downsides will diminish.

Jeff said...

I live in Argentina, so I have to take into account the import tariff (and then the local markup), which often results in electronics being doubled the price.

Then the fact that territorial rights might even prevent me from buying the e-books, even though those books are not even available here. So an e-book is actually useful for those of us who live abroad.

wendy said...

Oh, look, at the moment I've so many important, large expenses to worry about (new fridge, stove and major renovations to the house)that an e-reader would be the last thing. If I ever come into wealth, then I'd invest in such a thing as a luxury indulgence. I rarely leave the house so it's not something I need. I'd rather have a beautiful book to display in a book case.

Sandy said...

Until they start selling ebooks at reasonable prices (I am not paying the same price for an intangible book as I do a 'real' book), I have no desire to own an ereader.

Balinares said...

Hi Nathan, hi all,

Seeing as an ereader is the complementary product to ebooks, if the publishers really wanted to make ebooks take off they'd send you an ereader for free with your first ebook purchase.

The product of interest here is the book, not the reader. Expecting the user -- not you, Nathan, and not me, but the regular guy who doesn't live and breathe books -- to pay for the privilege of buying books, might be a little over-optimistic.

When ereaders become ultracheap, generic and interchangeable between brands, they'll take off.

Beth T Irwin said...

You'd have to pay me and I'd still not want it. Real books can be smuggled and shared with people in countries that have censors. Real books not only survive deployments in conditions never dreamed of by insulated IT people who don't deal with the real world, but their end pages can be used to start a fire in emergency conditions or to keep journals or write letters or sketch out information under combat conditions. Real books can be given to school children in dire need of textbooks or ANY books in my language so they can better themselves.

david elzey said...

i'm not interested in supporting barnes & noble's exclusionary business practices any more than amazon's.

five years from now the e-readers will have a $30 price point and you won't be limited to proprietary devices. until then, as a gift i wouldn't refuse it.

Paul Neuhardt said...

Echoing what someone else said here, I thought iPods and MP3 players were items I had no interest in, at least until I got one as a gift. Now you would have to pry my 5G iPod Classic out of my cold dead hands, or offer me an iPod Touch to replace it with (and let me keep the Classic).

I suppose it might easily work the same way for me with an ereader. Once I got one I might never want to give it up.

Eric Christopherson said...

Dedicated ereaders will go extinct within a few years, starting when Apple's multifunctional iTablet debuts.

K.L. Brady said...

Personally, I'm a serious gadget queen. From the key finder to NuWave Oven, I've yet to find a gadget that I didn't LOVE. If the Kindle or Nook were around the $100mark, there is NO question that I'd have one already. But with the economy such as it is, I feel I have to justify spending nearly $300. At $100-$150, I don't have to justify it so much.

I see E-Readers going the way of video game systems in time. The price will drop significantly once the newness all wears off and companies realize price is a major reason why demand isn't higher.

moirayoung said...

Really, this is the same law game consoles face. The less expensive the device, the more likely it is that people will buy one and make use of it (i.e., shell out money for games, or in this case books). All the cool (read: rich) kids get them when they first come out, and then the rest of us follow suit when the price falls enough.

I voted $100. The current cost of the average e-reader is still prohibitive enough to me that I won't get one until a) my cell phone craps out and I can upgrade to an iPhone, or b) someone gives me one as a gift.

Cam Snow said...

I would pay $200 or more for one, but there is a huge caveat to that - I currently live in Egypt and print English language books are really hard to come by for anything not on the best-seller list. However, Egypt isn't on the list of the 113 countries that the Kindle (or wonderbook in this case) will work in, so I ain't buyin' one.

ann foxlee said...

I don't have a problem with the Kindle or nook or e-readers in general, and I think they certainly serve their purpose for some segments of the population. I even think they will increase readership over time (though probably not sales, since some of that readership will likely be pirated).
My problem is the thought that it would or should replace paper books.
Some people keep comparing it to music: vinyl vs. 8-track vs. cassette vs. cd vs. mp-3...etc. The difference is that recorded music is a fairly new concept compared to the written word, and its formats have changed so regularly in response to the different desires of the public (portability and sound quality being the main two drivers of the technology), that it is only natural for music delivery to have changed the way it has.
Books on the other hand, are inherently portable, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive (for paperbacks anyway).
At this point, the only thing an ereader has over a book is the ability to store a whole lot of books in one small space. Which is useful for certain people-- students, teachers, publishing industry folks, travelers, super voracious readers.... But for most people, it is simply unneccessary, and is cheaper and easier to just grab a book. Add to that the collectability of books, the common act of passing on well-read, well-loved books to the next generation, and I don't think books in paper form will ever disappear.
I certainly think book publishers will over time have to find new ways to stay in the game, and that POD will become a new norm. Perhaps publishers will have their own POD machines in your favorite bookstore, or something...

In the meantime, I have no use for a piece of electronics that can only do the one thing, so I'm sticking my tongue out at them.
Maybe once they can do more, or are incorporated into multitasking devices, I would consider it for my more impulse book buys.
For books I know I want though, I will always buy the hardcover edition, so my kids can one day read them and learn to grow fond of 'old book smell'.

Enusan said...

I'd happily buy an e-reader for up to 100 dollars if the books I could get on them only cost 1. But if the books cost 9 I'm better off with my used book stores.

Annalee said...

my vote for $150 comes with the caveat that this hypothetical e-reader supports non-DRM'ed formats. I don't sign licenses for things I purchase, and I don't rent things I can get from the library for free. Readers that only support locked-down content are therefore useless to me.

But yeah, an e-reader that supports formats like .pdf, and allows me to back my stuff up myself so that I don't have to trust that Amazan will graciously abstain from destroying my property, could get $150 put of me. I base that on having spent $189 on a Dell Mini-9 Netbook. I'd pay about as much for the one as the other.

SphinxnihpS of Aker-Ruti said...

I'd like to be the B&N version, however, AT&T 3G network sucks for my area. We had to go with Sprint because we kept getting dropped connections with AT&T's.

Next, I wouldn't mind shelling out $250+ if ebooks were priced below mass markets (I feel a little differently if there are no other editions out there save for hardback.). Otherwise, I'll be saving money by buying the paperback.

Jodi

Uninvoked said...

If e-books were available for purchase for $0.99 after buying the e-reader, I'd buy one at any of those prices. After all, I can store 10,000 books on it and not take up any extra space. After that, I see one basic flaw.

$10 for a single data transfer AFTER paying $350 to house it? Are you outta yo' damn mind? I can go to book store, and get any book I want for $10. The way the markets going, I could probably get free coffee and foot rub from desperate salesmen while I read it too. Why would I pay $10 and get, physically speaking, nothing in return? It's stupid.

Thradar said...

>$100...unless ebooks are sold at ridiculously low prices. The model should be give the reader away for free (or loss, or no profit) and sell ebooks at regular price (compared to print). What we have now are readers costing $300 and ebooks costing the same as a print book.

NO thanks.

Thradar said...

Ooops, I mean <$100

Anonymous said...

People who are so adamant about not wanting an e-reader, or so against them are the same people who thought television would kill live theater. Get with the times, like it or not technology has taken over a LOT of things. Just look at grocery shopping, people can scan in their own groceries now. ATM's anyone?

RainSplats said...

I like the idea, but I'm not ready to sink money into it. I like that you can "lend" your ebooks to a friend. They need more. It should play my music, too.

The ebooks are too expensive.

If they had a program where you'd get half off when you give your reader back to upgrade to the new version, I'd have it already. The technology isn't quite there yet.

Sinking money into a device that will be outdated by the end of the year doesn't appeal to me.

RainSplats said...

Why aren't they donating ereaders to school kids? or kids who need books?

Henriette Power said...

Never thought I would say this, but I actually would love to own a nook (I know there's not supposed to be an article there, but it just sounds too weird to say "own nook".). I love actual books, but I'm sure I would read more if I had an e-reader. I can imagine having a multi-tiered experience of reading: books I buy (always in paperback because I love that kind of binding), books I read on an e-reader, books I read on my iPhone. As I wrote recently on my blog, there's room for all of it in this paradoxically hyper-literate new world.
http://henriettepower.blogspot.com/2009/10/when-is-book-not-book.html

etc at Fierce and Nerdy said...

My husband is an early adopter and gave me a Kindle for our paper anniversary, otherwise I wouldn't have picked $300. I think $100 is a good range. If I really want something, I'll pay $100 for it from shoes to purses.

That all said, if I had known how much I would love my Kindle, I would have bought it for $300 no problem. However, now it's a lot like a car bought new in 2007. You loved it ... til you saw the 2008 version ... and now there's a 2010 nook. And I want it.

Literary Cowgirl said...

Thank you so much Mira! I didn't want to go off of my own contract as it is for a children's book, and I would not presume that it in any way would be the same as what is happening out there with adult fiction. I had heard that many of the big publishers were raking authors over the coals on erights. However, it would seem that I may now be able to look around at ereaders with a guilt free conscience.

Gail Dayton said...

I bought mine with Christmas money, so it was essentially a gift. BUT, I would have bought it anyway. I have a Sony 505, and I love it. Love the e-ink, love the capacity, love the long-lasting battery. I even love that it is NOT Internet capable, because I have to control my bookaholism somehow.

The only thing I don't love is that it's kind of hard to page back through to check on something I thought I read, but I'm not sure I remember.

I think a lot of people will eventually use their phone/devices as readers, but I'm one of those that doesn't want all the bells & whistles on my phone because that monthly access fee is so dang expensive. When that goes down...

Still, I loves me my Sony.

globalgal said...

Cam Snow in Egypt and Jeff in Argentina:

I'm in China. Yes, it's true that the Kindle and nook are nearly useless to us who are in countries where you can't purchase the ebooks, BUT I purchase ebooks all the time from online sellers - ebooks.com, Powell's, etc. and have no problems downloading them to my laptop (only one or two times I couldn't because of my geographic region and ebook restrictions.) Right now, Sony Reader is our only real ereader option. But don't discount ebooks as an option to reach the English language books you crave. I also suggest audiobooks, way more expensive, but I do what I have to do to access good books!

Pamala Knight said...

My Kindle2 was a present. Now, I'm suffering from a serious case of wanting to cheat with the Nook. But I've restrained myself. For how long, I can't say because HOLY MOTHER OF GOD, I'm in big time lust with the Nook.

So what if I do most of my online book buying at Amazon? A simple switch with the credit card and bang, you're in business at B&N. Browsing while I'm in the store. A good thing. The pretty color pixels have turned my head and finally, being able to LEND my books out like normal people do? Oh hell to the yes.

Now, how do I break up with the Kindle2, especially since I'm very fond of it. AND, it was a present. From my husband. OhmygodIneedanaccompliceandanexcuse.

*Sigh* What was the question?

Southpaw said...

I don't like that it's not (that I could find) backlit. My current e-reader is, so I can read anywhere - in a dark little corner on a rainy day and not have to hunt for a light source.

Voidwalker said...

Wow after 147 posts, it seems that I'll just be another voice in the e-slush pile lol, but I'll still tell you what I think.

I plan on buying one and I don't feel that $200 is all that much to ask for considering the convenience of it all. And FREE copywrite-expired books... You can get your moneys worth out of that alone!

I'm very excited

Linguista said...

I like paper and pages. When e-books can give me that, maybe I'll jump on board. I still don't own an i-pod (and I'm only in my 20's). I just like the real thing.

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