Nathan Bransford, Author


Monday, June 8, 2009

This is a Blog

I briefly mentioned this in a previous post, but I have to be honest that it's mildly alarming how many queries I receive that misuse the word "blog." I've seen everything from "the webpostings on your Blogsite" to "your blogspot on your website." People are personalizing, which is great, but... word people should not be misusing words.

Now, before I get accused of sarcasm for writing this post: this is not sarcasm. Some people need this info, and hopefully this will clear things up.

Let's drill down a bit into the different words and usage. OED, eat your heart out:

The whole shebang: it's a blog, singular. It's not blogs or a blogger or a blogsite or a blogpsot. Just: blog. Or, if you want to get fancy, weblog, only no one really says that. Example: "I read your blog."

An individual entry on the blog: a post. Example: "I loathed your post on rhetorical questions, but I'm submitting to you anyway." ("Entry" is interchangeable with "post." Thanks, Scott).

Multiple entries on the blog: posts. Example: "Thank you for your posts on The Hills, which were deeply philosophically illuminating."

Proper usage of the word "blogs": Blogs, plural, refers to different blogs at different sites. Example: "I like to procrastinate by reading as many publishing industry blogs as possible."

Blog as a verb: Blogging as an overall activity is "to blog." Example: I blog, you blog, we blog, they blog. (thanks to Charlie for suggestion this addition). However, to add something specific to your blog you can either use the past tense of "blog" or "post." Example: "I posted an entry on blogging" or "I blogged about blogging today." (thanks to Kate)

A person who blogs: A blogger. Example: "He is a wild and crazy blogger."

And with that, I'll conclude this webposting.






121 comments:

Lisa Schroeder said...

Now you will most likely get queries that say, "I love your whole shebang, Mr. Bransford."

Sara said...

Here, here!

Now chapter two needs to clear up the matter of "tweets", "twittering" and the "twitosphere."

Julie Weathers said...

Thanks. I wondered where the word "blog" came from in the first place.

Kiersten said...

I believe "blogspotting" is a sport, is it not? The equipment was too expensive, but I've seen some nice coffee table books on The Joys of Blogspotting.

Galen Kindley--Author said...

This is bloggone good info.

Bane of Anubis said...

Dear Mr. Bransford,

I really enjoyed your post today about your trip aboard the SMS Fury...

So much anger, my young Padawan :) -

all joking aside, your frustration sounds similar to mine with subjunctives.

Margaret Yang said...

Next post: the difference between toward and towards. (Hint, the latter is British.)

Lunatic said...

I want to know who the hell thought up the word weblog or blog in the first place. It's too close to blob. I'm starting a petition to make it a chewy. And to change a post to a spit.

Fred

Ink said...

"Barf."

"Oh no, get away from me!"

"No, no, that's my name. Barf. I'm a Mog. Half-man and half-dog. I'm my own best friend!"


Ah, Jim Candy, what will we do without you?

Anonymous said...

Ever notice that a "blog" is just one "l" away from a "bog?" I don't think it is just a coincidence.

Mary Jo

lauren said...

Ooh yeah, the misuse of "blog" is a big pet peeve with me, too. My local newspaper's website is a HUGE offender of blog-linguistics misuse. Even more annoying, most of the regular commenters on the newspaper's various blogs refer to themselves as "bloggers." Argh! A person who comments on a blog is not automatically a blogger!

Bane of Anubis said...

Margaret, that's another peeve - oooh, toward, backward, forward, etc... what's it up in Canadia, Bryan - English or Yankee style?

Dara said...

Good info! I agree with Sara: there should be a clarification post on Twitter--I'm still Twitter Illiterate :P

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

Anyone one else wasted minutes researching the origin of 'shebang' ?

Phil said...

Additionally, weblog works.

Ink said...

Bane,

Both. Canada is like No Man's Land, a sort of giant free for all. I see both... and probably use both. Terrible, I know. I'm guessing, technically, we're probably supposed to tag along with the Brits. I like tea, too. And crumpets. Well, I'm not sure I've ever actually had a crumpet. But I've had scones, so that will have to do. Hell, I'll just eat some donuts. I am Canadian, after all, eh?

Bryan

Charlie said...

Couldn't blog also be used as a verb? I blog, you blog, we all blog for eggnog.

A silly blogger blogs to a fellow blogger in a blog about bloggers misusing the word blogs, has spoken.

Kate said...

What about blog as a verb?
As in, "I managed to get in a bit of blogging this weekend."
Or is it more technically correct to say, "I managed to get in a bit of posting to my blog this weekend."?

Ink said...

And John Candy posthumously changed his name to Jim. In case anyone was wondering. Someone please inform his Estate.

Nathan Bransford said...

Thanks, Charlie, updated accordingly.

Bane of Anubis said...

Bryan, well, you are The Melting Pot's northern stepchild (the simmering pot, maybe), so that make's sense :) (hugs and kisses from your southern upstart troglodyte :)

Elaine - didn't look up shebang (I figure google's gonna come back w/ some sites the missus would not approve of); however, used the phrase "three sheets to the wind" yesterday and my wife looked at me like I was nuts - I looked that up and learned that being sheeted to the wind is a 4 stage process - who knew?

Nathan Bransford said...

Thanks also Kate, updated accordingly.

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

I've been re-writing Treasure Island for 11 year olds - I now know a lot of 'ancient' nautical phrases - 'run that on up the mizzen mast' and see if it sticks!

Memoirs of a Bulimic Black Boy said...

“but... word people should not be misusing words.”

Unless using them to communicate with a body of people who have, share, appreciate and agree upon an alternate understanding of the word. I’d hate to have to purge all my non-white Standard English writing authors. Language is fluid and therefore transforms often independent of its creator. The word Google is a prime example, we use it as a verb however Google is a noun.

T. Anne said...

Thanx for the blogolicious post.

Scott said...

An entry is a post, but you can also post an entry. Does that make entry and post interchangeable? I've always operated under that assumption.

lysid said...

Technically, this could be called your Blogspot or Blogger, as opposed to your LiveJournal or Dreamwidth account or whatever the kids are flocking to these days.

Fawn Neun said...

Hmmm... I dunno. I think "Blogsite" is kinda cute and fun to say. ;)

PurpleClover said...

I <3 Nathan's blogspot.


Sorry I had to. Maybe "blogs" was a typos?

Sorry I had to again.

I will admit I went back to check my query from the Agent-For-a-Day contest to be sure I used "blog" and everything was written in the correct context. lol.

Nathan Bransford said...

Thanks, Scott, I agree, updated accordingly.

Creager Studios said...

Wonder if the word 'Blog' originated from the small nation of Bloglandia? The land where everyone speaks in short sentences about silly things they observe or do.

sex scenes at starbucks said...

Yes, I cringe when I see posts referred to as "blogs."

Goodie said...

For Memoirs of a BBB:

You should google Merriam-Webster, my friend. I google, you google, we google and blog!

bryngreenwood said...

Hmmmm...so you're saying the elusive blogspot isn't just a myth? And men have them, too?

Justus M. Bowman said...

You posted wisely.

Thermocline said...

Blogger is kinda boring. Bloggo or Blogette might be more useful. Maybe Dark Blogotron if you're an artificial intelligence trying to take over the internet.

Rick Daley said...

"I like to procrastinate by reading as many publishing industry blogs as possible."

OMG...you do that too?

Jil said...

Good, I needed all that clarification, although "Post" was the word I had most trouble with. What about "alright" and "all right"?

I don't mind how many words are added to our language, it's the ones that fall by the wayside that frustrate me. Such as, "I saw an actor in Safeway today." I now must use extra words to find out if it's male or female because we can't use "actress."Grrr!

Elizabeth said...

I would think that anyone who can't get these simple terms straight couldn't be that good a writer, as writing is communication (no matter the form), and someone who can't communicate effectively can't be easy to read. Sounds like a good excuse to trash a query to me!

Buffra said...

I know this wasn't meant to be sarcastic. Maybe it wasn't even meant to be funny, really.

But I can't stop giggling madly at the whole thing. I think I'm going to read it again, just for the giggle factor.

Who knew a basic refresher in "blogging" would be so darn amusing?!

WV: curaffs -- the hill-billy cut-off jeans version of a carafe, often made out of an old tin can

Erin said...

Make sure to watch out for "typo's" on your "blogger" :)

Jen P said...

Well, right now, this is general correct usage of accepted terminology, agreed. But language is fluid and on the web and in the media, more so than anywhere. The words develop and change as they become used, so if a significant population (even if you believe ignorantly mis-)use the words frequently they do become accepted as the correct use of language.

I agree with you 100% “but... word people should not be misusing words.” And in queries, right now, people should use the accepted term correctly. But are we not also responsible for creating terms and developing them over time? The terms Orwellian and Big Brother spring to mind from a recent article. The word 'fat', would seem to have its whole own street meaning, which would be considered plain wrong in other situations.

And mistakes which become common usage become acceptable and held to be correct over time. - Different from and different to, being my pet favourite.

House 6 said...

Oh, good gravy... people get confused by this? That's scary!

AnonBlogger said...

And all the blogs out there together are the "blogosphere."

Mira said...

Lol. I enjoyed this post.

I liked the verb breakdown, especially.

However, you left out the adverb forms: bloggedly, bloggally, bloggically.

Adverbs are very important.

Anonymous said...

I love when things like this get pointed out to crowds. Could you please enter a post letting people know that if you "could care less," you care at least a little, but if you "couldn't are less," you truly don't give a fig?

RW said...

You don't include "weblog" in your lexography--the longer term that "blog" is an abbreviation of.

I suppose in a formal business email it's really better to use the the complete term, weblog. Blog is just too casual.

Sarcasm ;)

Anonymous said...

"Couldn't CARE less." Ugh.

DebraLSchubert said...

I also use blogosphere (which is listed in Wikipedia, btw) or blogiverse. In this day and age, with the technology changing faster than you can say, "tweet!" or "blog!" it's no surprise that not everyone is on the same blogalicious boat.

Jordan McCollum said...

THANK YOU! People saying that they "have a blog up today" always drives me crazy. I mean, unless they're planning on taking their blog down tomorrow...

Nett Robbens said...

Great post, Nathan ...

I cringe at the misuse of the apostrophe

Nett

Holly Bodger said...

Looking forward to similar post on Twitter, but am afraid you might tell us that a tweet in the past tense is a..., well, a..., well, I can't say or my post won't pass the spam test.

P.S. Bryan/Ink: what do you mean you've never had a crumpet? Have you been hiding in Saskatchewan???

Jennifer Shirk said...

Oh, okay. So say blog "post" or blog "entry" NOT blog thingy.

Gotcha. Thanks. :)

Anonymous said...

Seriously?

Writers who don't know what a blog is should stick to querying agents that only accept snail mail and will respond after 3 months.

Thomas Burchfield said...

Hi Nathan: I tried to respond to your reply, but it got sent back as spam, so I just want to say "Thanks" for getting back to me on that.

But "blog" is really a horrid word, IMHO, and I'm happy to see it abused until someone comes up with something better.

I'm posting my "essays" again over at the Red Room, if any of you folks are interested.

Lisa said...

Jen P: Check out "The Language Instinct" by Steven Pinker.

Melanie Avila said...

This post filled me with joy, a common experience when I visit your blog.

Melanie Avila said...

And ROFLMAO at Lisa's comment (#1)!!

susiej said...

Thanks for the post (and the chance to procrastinate).

Ink said...

Holly,

I'm a proud Ontarioan! Well, I was proud until my city fell apart. Ah, Windsor...

And, in fact, now that I think about it I'm not exactly sure I even know what a crumpet is... I have a feeling it's edible and floury, but this could be wrong.

Little Miss Trumpet
Sat on her crumpet,
eating her curds and whey...

It must be large, whatever it is...


:)


Bryan

Central Content Publisher said...

A few more.

This is a "comment" in response to a "post" or to another "comment", in all likelihood, itself a response to the "post". This makes me a "commenter" rather than a "commentator", which would be someone commenting on a post from another site rather than within the blog of origin.

This is not a "post", so I am not a "poster", and though the poster (aka. the blogger) may leave comments, particularly comments addressing commenters (for you'll find they rarely comment on themselves), they are always known as the poster or blogger or author, even when addressed in regard to a comment they have made. Remember; even if he happens to be doing the dishes, the king is never a dishwasher. Beware; commenters can be called authors too, because, like posts, comments are also authored.

When citing a comment a poster has made on someone else's blog, you should refer to them as "poster" when you are commenting on their blog, and as "commenter" when commenting on someone else's blog, but can refer to them as blogger or poster if you yourself are blogging about a citation made by some foreign poster on your blog, one assumes, in response to one of your own posts.

The things commenters do, happen "on" a blog, while the things posters do, happen "in" a blog. Nathan Bransford writes in his blog, while I write on his blog. There are two exceptions to this. First...

...I'm just going to stop here. I'm actually torturing myself at this point.

Lucy said...

...as well as the rest of us...

That wasn't mean, right? ;-)

Kristi said...

I'm one of those people who had no idea what any of these terms meant before last year, but I also didn't send out queries proving my incompetence. I have since consulted my "nearest teenager" and taught myself "to blog" - I like the verb form best. "Google" is definitely a verb as another commenter noted - I personally Google or tell someone else to Google at least 10 times per day. Anyway, I beg you not to delve into Twitter or tweeting or whatever it is, because I can't handle learning something else right now...I'm trying to write a book! :)

Marilyn Peake said...

I imagine specific blog terms are partially personal preference because Internet technology is still evolving. "Blog" is short for "weblog", and some Internet computer business sites still refer to "blogs" as "weblogs" or "web logs". There is even a Weblog Awards program. Some sites differentiate among the different types of blogs now available, e.g. "photoblog" or "vlog" which is the abbreviated form of "video log". A microblog is a blog of short comments about a poster’s daily life, and "Twitter" is technically a "microblog".

Twitter terms are now evolving as well. Interestingly enough, About.com has a web log (web log is the term they use) about Twitter terminology. When you post on Twitter, you actually "tweet", and the people to whom you send your "tweets" are fellow "tweeps". In addition, if you want to copy and send someone else’s tweet to your subscribers, you type RT for "retweet" followed by the @ sign before the Twitter name of the person who originally sent out the tweet.

I like Conan O’Brien’s joke that, in the year 3000, YouTube, Twitter and FaceBook will combine to form YouTwitFace.

inkgrrl said...

THANK YOU!!!

I'm not always a formalist, but there are lines that should not be crossed, simply for clarity's sake.

Anonymous said...

From Peter Rubie's bbo, The Elements of Storytelling, he quotes Thomas Mann:

"A writer is somebody for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people."

Every Single Time I write, I learn how to use words better.

But if I had to do it in the reverse, I probably would never have dared to write at all.

Especially, on computers, typos slip up so easily or the wrong word.

Some would have us run away in shame. Others nurture the tender writer, take his hand, and help him to play the game better as he goes.

I am dyslexic. I appreciate learning the correct ways when my brain has made a pattern–a mistaken pattern–of a word. But please don't assume, because of my typos or learning curves, (that an editor could easily remedy) that my story is also a miss (pun intended).

Elaine 'still writing' Smith said...

@ Jen P

'Fat' in teen-speak is generally 'phat' - to differentiate.

Vacuum Queen said...

What a great post about blogging on your blog.
Do I get an "A" ?

CJ Raymer said...

"I blog, you blog, we blog, they blog."

Sounds like an old Cyndi Lauper song. Can you say, "she bops?" Er, "she blogs."

Chris Bates said...

Bransford knew his site copped its share of attacks. It didn't matter, he had Mr Brown’s canon at his disposal. That sucker would outgun the bastards, even if he had to stay cornered in this god-forsaken blog cabin he had built.

-------------

Endless rants had been posted throughout the night. Now the dawn arrived and with it the mist. Bransford sculled three fingers of duty-free 'tension-tamer' tea, savoured the scald then waited for his head to clear. The internet always clouded his brain. Too much crap writing, rolling in on him like a San Francisco blog.

---------------

Collective term? A web of blogs, perhaps?


Gotta go work ... too much procrastination.

pjd said...

Loving the comments. (BTW, you might want to add a subsection for terms referring to the comments section of a post. Then the archives of a blog. Hey, maybe you should write a book.)

Jen P is right that language, especially as it relates to current technology, is fluid.

Recently on a conference call, my coworker noted that the call was being "tape recorded" and people could download the mp3 in a few days from our intranet site. In fact, no tape was ever used. My children don't even know what "tape record" means. When they saw a Sony Walkman in a TV show recently, they thought it was some huge mp3 player. They were aghast to find out that us old folks used to have to use cassette tapes. They kept asking how you downloaded songs from iTunes to the tape.

At least I'm clever enough not to call Blogger a BBS. (Anyone here old enough to know what BBS stands for? How about "baud"?)

M. K. Clarke said...

And we're on the topic of using the English words properly ...

Irregardless (no such word -- regardless if you've heard/seen it used correctly -- and in this case, you didn't).

Could care less (caring less for that whichever it is you care more for that other that) vs.
Couldn't care less (In the vernacular of Clark Gable: "I don't give a damn.") :)

"Needless to say ... " well, duh, don't say it, then.

Abuse/misuse of "too" and "to" and "your" and "you're."

Overcooked the gerunds in a story/novel.

Excessive use of "that."

Too much sugar of passive voice.

And someone left the salt shaker cap off the well of HASs, HAVEs and HASs. Enough!

Awesome birthday entry, Nathan, thank you.

(yes, it's my birthday, ppl not his -- but if it is, Have a happy just the same. :))

~Missye

Gretchen said...

I love the author who sends out an e-mail announcement each time she blogs announcing her new blog is up at...blah blah blah

I corrected her once, she still didn't get it.

It's a POST...sheesh.

Bane of Anubis said...

Technically, irregardless is a word; though regardless is preferred. With everything else, I concur.

Memoirs of a Bulimic Black Boy said...

"For Memoirs of a BBB:

You should google Merriam-Webster, my friend. I google, you google, we google and blog!"

Linguistic purists and Patent & Trademark attorneys would beg to differ. Like Xerox, Google is a corporate which over time has come to mean something other than it was intended for. That Merriam-Webster defines Google as a verb only supports my original post that words (not unlike identities) evolve and sometimes take on entirely different meanings. What is important is that the people who are offering and receiving the communication share an understanding of the words being communicated or at the very least understand the possibility of other interpretation. Which I guess is why I think word people should use, misuse, challenge, invent, retire, mix them up, strip them down and pretty much anything else they want to do with them.

Chad

Ink said...

M.K.,

"irregardless" is a word (though considered inelegant). So Says Messrs. Webster, Oxford and Penguin. Pedantic fellows, I know, but everyone's got a fault or two. Just don't invite them to the party - they really kill the small talk with all that stuff about "onomatopoeia" and "dyspepsia". Always a downer, that dyspepsia...

Ink said...

Lol, Bane. Great minds yada yada yada...

Dawn Maria said...

Blog-gone-it! Damn good post.

D. G. Hudson said...

Nathan,
Thanks for the reminder of how we manage to maul the English language using 'blog' as an example. Those are great points from the other readers as well, and I like how you update your post with info after the initial posting.

INK said:
RE - English crumpets, "Well, I'm not sure I've ever actually had a crumpet."

INK: Hello fellow Canuck!
For the record, a English crumpet as far as I know it is a spongy type of breakfast bread with lots of little holes on top, they're circular about 3-4 inches, and are great with honey, as it drips into the little holes. They serve them at the Empress Hotel in Victoria, BC. We have lots of ex-Brits here in British Columbia.

Katie said...

Sorry if this has already been answered - I haven't read through every comment.

But the word "blog" originated from: web log. Nathan keeps a web log. But then a very smart someone put the two words together, ditched the we in web, and voila! We have a blog.

Tim Bosworth said...

As far as twitter goes, twitter is the website. When you send a message you "tweet" you don't twitter. Twitter is a noun, not a verb.

You don't blogspot either. You go to some website.blogspot.com. Jeez.

People should use these terms accurately. If they don't it's a good indication that they don't really get these particular tools. Any writer who so much misses what the words mean, you have to wonder how good a writer they are.

JMO

allegory19 said...

Okay, I have to admit - the misuse of the word "blog" and any of its derivatives have never bothered me. But I could see how it would if I dealt with it everyday.

I hope this isn't one of those things that now that it's been brought to my attention is going to make me go crazy!!!!

lotusgirl said...

How could I just say "blog" when what you really provide is a "blog-o-rama of bloggy informationocity"? (Could I use that on my query?)

Chuck H. said...

Arrgh! Continue on.

MzMannerz said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
MzMannerz said...

My post was irrelevant once I went back and read your first line. ;)

Blee Bonn said...

I enjoy your blog! I just created my own this past weekend! Wahoo!

michaelejahn said...

is it okay to say "I keep a blog" he asks timidly ?

Kristi said...

I have a question for any skillful bloggers out there. I just found out my email subscribe button has not been working on my blog (several people emailed me to tell me they weren't getting updated posts).

So tonight I changed the HTML code and fixed it, but does Feedburner keep track of the actual email addresses so I know who to contact to re-subscribe? Yes, I looked it up on Blogger help but couldn't find it and I think I'm going cross-eyed now after the last two hours, so any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Sounds like someone needs a nap.

Writer from Hell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Writer from Hell said...

Keep up the good work Mr. Blog! That was entertaining and informative.

I wonder sometimes, whether English language evolution is already over and if it has now entered the devolution phase.

clindsay said...

For some reason I find it incredibly sad that there was a need for you to post this. But, yes. There was. Cos I get them, too.

Sigh...

Anonymous said...

Honestly I think your a little bit of a nerd (in a good way), thanks for the laugh - I mean info.

Jen C said...

Irregardless is a perfectly cromulent word.

(Short posts only. No complete sentences. Must finish first draft of novel. 15K words to go.)

Laura Martone said...

Late to the party today... but still pleased I stopped by. It saddens me that the English language has devolved over the years (as Writer from Hell suggested) - the fact that words like "blog," "tweet," and "google" have now become actual verbs is, well, a little disturbing... and yet I very much appreciate today's lesson. Even if the devolution of standard English is disconcerting, I find it best to be able to communicate in our fast-moving computer age without sounding like a total dunce!

Regardless (or should I say "irregardless"?), I must admit - between Nathan's blogalicious blow-by-blow and the trippy explanations by the likes of Central Content Publisher and Marilyn Peake (thanks by the way!), I was reminded of "The Princess Bride" (which I'm currently reading):

Wesley: Truly, you have a dizzying intellect!

Vizzini: Just WAIT till I get going!

Jen P said...

@Lisa - thanks for the book tip. Looks interesting.

@ Elaine 'Still writing" Smith - thanks for the spelling - I had no idea what this meant until very recently - I live in Germany and a current TV advert (in German) for fat-free cream used a little boy dressed as a rapper saying it was (translated) "full fat" - intending to mean 'cool' etc - but the sister argues it's not, because it's fat-free. (You can see where it goes.) So that's even more odd now, when it isn't even the same word, it's just translated from its sound, not written use.

Ego said...

@Tim Bosworth

In the real world, Twitter is primarily a verb:

"Those darn birds twitter all day long."

and secondarily a noun:

"I heard a twitter behind me, so I turned..."

Therefore I've always wondered why one tweets instead of twittering. (Well, ok, I've only wondered for the past year or two.)

Does everyone else still feel silly saying they tweeted too?

Chatty Kelly said...

I'm a blogger, you're a blogger, he's a blogger, she's a blogger...wouldn't you like to be a blogger too?

(to the tune of Dr Pepper commercial)

s.w. vaughn said...

Central Content Publisher: However did you author that comment without your head exploding? :-)

Scott said...

The word irregardless is similar to "reiterate" in that it has more letters and syllables than it needs to say the same thing.

And can I say that I abhore the term "tweet". We're on the fast track to becoming pets for aliens with that one.

Hey Nathan, if you're still here, have you considered threaded comments where a commenter can respond directly below another commenter's comments? Not sure if blogger.com does them or not, but it might be interesting if a little messy looking.

Walter said...

Seems so self-explanatory, but I guess to some, it's not.

Ink said...

Oh! Is a crumpet what we call an English Muffin? Because I love English Muffins! But if that is so, why don't they just call it a crumpet? I guess they feel my wee Canadian intellect is incapable of handling the crumpet concept. But then, well, the term English Muffin is misleading since it in no way resembles a muffin (whatever the nationality).

Very tough, this crumpet conundrum.

Mary said...

Is "Blogolicious" acceptable?

Similar, to the now classic "Bootylicious"

:-)

I just googled "blogolicious" and it's all over the web! Dang, I'm always way behind the latest trends...

Mary Nelson said...

Excellent post and terrific commentary!!

For those of you who want further definitions, I just discovered Wordnik, a new kind of definition service (I hesitate to call it a dictionary). Here's their explanation of a blog:
http://www.wordnik.com/words/blog

From Wordnik's 'about' page:
"Our goal is to show you as much information as possible, just as fast as we can find it, for every word in English, and to give you a place where you can make your own opinions about words known."

Diana said...

Ink - Not sure how we got from blogs to breakfast pastry, however - a crumpet is not the same as an English muffin; at best, they're cousins.

A crumpet is thicker, therefore when toasted it's a nice combo of crunchy on top and chewy in the middle. Also, the holes for holding honey/jam are on the top of a crumpet, versus in the centre of an English muffin.

Hungry now...

Ink said...

Now I want an English Muffin. And a crumpet. Yes, I would like to eat an English Muppet. Cruel, but true.

KG said...

I agree with your definitions. Good job on getting the word out.

Janet said...

"Word people should not be misusing words."

What does it say about me that a statement like this makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside?

Anonymous said...

That's funny. Rum and coke leave me all warm and fuzzy inside.

Mary Jo

Scott said...

Fuzzy-wuzzy was a bear. Fuzzy-wuzzy had no hair. Fuzzy-wuzzy wasn't fuzzy, was he?

Anonymous said...

Jen P,

I couldn't agree more. I've seen more than one agent confused by the way words are used in different regions. Before we get picky about things like this, maybe we should find out if things are changing, because word people, of all people, need to recognize this is possible, and that it is impossible to know every dialect.

Anonymous said...

well...the space between typos and misusing words is a mighty abyss to fall into and... all of us hobby writers have been forewarned...

Tomara Armstrong said...

This post made my day!
:-)
~2

Donna said...

Thank you Nathan! I also work in e-commerce (we do blog design for companies as well as build stores) full-time and I hear misuses every day, mainly, people mixing up blog and post. I love when people "get it."

Court said...

Haven't read all the comments to see if this has been mentioned, but I would make the following suggestion:

Adjective: Today was a rather bloggy day.
--> Today was a good day for blogging, hence, I blogged a lot.

Adverb: Whilst attempting prose, she slid into her former habit of writing bloggily, instead.
--> Her writing reads more like a post than a novel.

That's all. :o)

Joseph L. Selby said...

lysid is correct. Blogger and Blogspot are terms frequently used to differentiate between the various media available for bloggers (livejournal, etc.). So, some of the people submitting personalized queries may not be making the mistake you think they are.

Lisa Gioia-Acres said...

Since I'm just getting started, I'm glad to have this info! Looking forward to reading more of your wisdom.

Chris said...

This is funny. Reminds me of a room full of engineers who can't open a pickle jar. :-)

henrythesecond said...

Let's rise up and resist using blog as a verb. You write, you write in your blog. Do you journal, do you novel, do you poem? No, you write.

Ecommerce web design said...

Good points! Oftentimes if bloggers post sporadically, they are definitely less likely to get the dedicated readers they are searching for! Keep blogging.

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