Nathan Bransford, Author


Wednesday, September 19, 2007

What Are You Reading at the Moment?

I posed this You Tell Me once before and I thought it was really fun to hear about what people are reading. Well, some time has elapsed and so here's a repeat, this time with feeling:

What book(s) are you reading right now?

I'm reading WELCOME TO THE WORLD BABY GIRL by Fannie Flagg, getting in touch with my small town roots.

What about you?






129 comments:

James Bailey said...

"I Love You, Beth Cooper," by Larry Doyle.

Lighthearted entertainment if you need a break from thinking too hard. Kind of a time warp back to high school.

sex scenes at starbucks said...

THE HUNDREDTH MAN.

It's fabulous, especially the structure of the opening!

Scott said...

I will probably finish Robin McKinley's "Spindle's End" tonight.

Anonymous said...

ARTHUR AND GEORGE by Julian Barnes

I like the George part, but not so much the Arthur.

BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES

It's great. As usual.

WendyNYC

trenchgold said...

Five Skies by Ron Carlson

I have read mysteries for years and decided to read some different stuff for a while.

jjdebenedictis said...

I am reading nothing because *sniffle* the library workers in my city are on strike and have been for months. *wails*

C'mon CUPE 391! I'm pulling for you - go, team bibliophile!

Stephen Parrish said...

Bad Girl, by Maya Reynolds.

You all know Maya as a prominent publishing industry blogger. As of 4 September she's also an erotic romance author.

But be forewarned: Jack and Jill go up the hill, but not to fetch a pail of water.

Anonymous said...

TRIGGER by Susan Vaught

YA about a teen with brain damage who has to go back and figure out why he shot himself in the head. Just got started but the premise is intriguing and I'm hooked.

Laura in KC

'drew said...

I just finished the short book One City, a Declaration of Interdependence by Ethan Nichtern. Buddhist stuff, pretty well-written. For me, it helped me understand my genre better, because most Buddhist books are written by traditional monks, or else by the continuing early generation of Western practitioners, so I'm looking at what Buddhism means to my generation.

I'm also chipping away at King of Bollywood by Anupama Chopra, but it's a little disappointing. I thought it would be a more general look at Indian cinema, but it's mostly a star bio of Shah Rukh Khan. Which is mildly entertaining but a little too trivial.

I am also reading tons of stuff from my students. Fall semester is stress.

Bernita said...

Komarr by Lois McMaster Bujold - a book that satisfied both the reader for story and the writer for brilliant technique.

katemoss said...

Stealing Faces by Michael Prescott. The bursts of lyrically beautiful prose make up for the not-quite-deep-enough heroine. The villain is compelling me to continue.

Anonymous said...

Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child


Go Reacher!

getitwritten_guy said...

I'm working my way through 'Best Kept Secrets' by Les Roberts.

Liz said...

"The Devil's Right Hand" by Lilith Saintcrow. This is the third book in her Dante Valentine series, I read the first book on Saturday, the second on Monday.

Brian said...

“Audience Addressed/Audience Invoked: The Role of Audience in Composition Theory and Pedagogy.”

Oh, yeah, I should mention: school's in session.

And, yes, it's a riveting as it sounds.

amanda h said...

SON OF AVONAR by Carol Berg

I just met her at the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers' Conference. The book just pulled me in from the get go.

Kimber An said...

MASTER OF VERONA by David Blixt

The author had his publisher, St. Martins Press, send me a copy so that I could review it on my Enduring Romance blog. (Despite the title, we review other genres too.) I expected a paperback ARC, but received a hardback instead! Wow.

It's really cool too. Mr. Blixt is a master of description. He's also a Shakespearean actor, so he can really bring Renaissance Italy to life. I only hope I can bring it justice in my review.

Susan Helene Gottfried said...

Rebecca Drake's new thriller. And before that was Colleen Gleason's Gardella Vampire books (review to be turned in and posted soon).

dr. love said...

Crime and Punishment
by some Russian guy.

Jenny said...

About to read:

DARK NORTH by Gillian Bradshaw.

I will read ANY historical novel this woman writes. She writes stories that make me feel like I'm living in the period she creates. I wish she was more of a big name since she writes so much better than most of the historical novelists getting the big promotions nowadays.

This one is about Roman Britain. Her RENDER UNTO CAESAR was wonderfully quirky, and I loved the earlier Roman Britain tale, ISLAND OF GHOSTS.

Just finished:

CARVED IN SAND: WHEN ATTENTION FAILS AND MEMORY FADES IN MIDLIFE by Cathryn Jakobson Ramin.

A bit too much about the author's own journey--and her expensive restaurant meals and glitzy life of privilege--rather than about the topic which is one a lot of us would like to learn more about. This book had "Made for TV" written all over it.

David L. McAfee said...

Currently reading Subterranean, by James Rollins and The Skull Mantra, by Eliot Pattison.

burgy61 said...

"Night Sins," by Tami Hoag. A friend loaned it to me this last weekend and I plan on starting it yet this week.

Dwight's Writing Manifesto said...

Right Livelihoods: Three Novellas by Rick Moody

If I'm going to keep writing novellas, I might as well support the authors who write them.

Barbara said...

MISTBORN by Brandon Sanderson

Fresh and beautifully written fantasy.

Christopher M. Park said...

Right now it's STARDUST by Neil Gaiman -- it didn't seem like my sort of thing, but I wound up seeing the movie and liking it, and it turns out that the book is great also. His books don't have the best marketing copy on the back, it seems like.

Before that I read all three of Stephanie Meyer's TWILIGHT books in pretty short order -- man, that was an engrossing series, and I can't wait until the next one.

And I finally got around to reading Richard Matheson's I AM LEGEND just before that.

LitWitch said...

Just finished INTO THE WILD by Sarah Beth Durst (whom I met at a conference, SCBWI) and INTERWORLD by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves.

THE YIDDISH POLICEMAN'S UNION is next on my list by Michael Chabon.

Luc2 said...

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini.
After that I'll probably pick up on of the books from the Wheel of Time, in memory of Robert Jordan.

Jen said...

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE by Shirley Jackson.

Getting kinda scary now. (g)

Katie said...

So Brandon Sanderson has a new book out! I missed that. I'll have to check into it. I enjoyed Elantris!

I'm getting ready to start Dorothy Dunnett's Queen's Play, from the Lymond Chronicles. They're old, but I just discovered them, so they're new to me!

aden albert said...

Just finished Alan Moore's and Dave Gibbons' WATCHMEN, which was brilliant and even better than I had heard.

Now I'm going to read (again) McCarthy's BLOOD MERIDIAN.

cynjay said...

Oooh. Great list. I just blogged about this same thing last night.I loved Welcome To the World... Who knew Fannie Flag had such a great writing voice?

Trigger is wonderful read. Susan Vaught and I have the same agent so I've met her a few times - she really knows her stuff.

I only have time to read YA right now. Current reads are Beige by Cecil Castellucci and Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson.

Melanie Avila said...

The Scarlet Letter. I'm trying to get through some classics I missed back in the day. Publishing note: don't ever let your book be printed with forced justification. Ugh.

The Bag of Health and Politics said...

Stiff and How Doctor's Think. I am going to read God is Not Great next, I think. There was a wait list at the library for that one.

brian_ohio said...

Magic Bites - Ilona Andrews

The Good Guy - Dean Koontz

Merry Jelinek said...

I just finished, Interred With Their Bones by Jennifer Lee Carrell

If there are any Shakespeare fans who also like a good, thought provoking, thriller - I'd highly recommend it.

Gina Black said...

A Wrinkle in Time

Haven't read it in [mumble mumble] years.

Anonymous said...

The World Is Flat by Thomas Friedman, and while it's nonfiction, it's one of the scariest books I've ever read; especially for the coming generations.

And, of course, who could resist The Quickie with James Patterson.

Heidi the Hick said...

PRISONER OF TEHRAN by Marina Nemat

THE MAN WHO TASTED SHAPES by Richard E Cytowic MD

THE THIEF LORD by Cornelia Funke

One's a memoir by someone who used to be a member of my writer's group, one's fascinating research and one's our nightly installment family read.

Do not ask about my To Be Read shelf!!!! It's groaning under the weight!

Other Lisa said...

Finishing up SPECIAL TOPICS IN CALAMITY PHYSICS - first novel by a young writer. I'm finding it alternately entertaining and infuriating - I think it wins a prize for Most Forced Similes Per Page Ever.

I mean, "a cloud of perfume like a battered pinata"? A dog who "slumped to the rug, tired as a summer fling"? "her voice now pasteled, the harsher edges shaded with fingertips"?

Okay I guess that last one isn't a simile but I have never been good at keeping such terms straight.

C.J. said...

"Tarantula" by Bob Dylan

Calenhíril said...

I'm almost done with THE MASQUE OF THE BLACK TULIP by Lauren Willig. The library happened to have all three of the available books on the shelf, so I thought I'd give them a try...after I'm done with those, it's off to Book 2 of the Kingmaker, Kingbreaker series by Karen Miller, THE AWAKENED MAGE, and CYBERMANCY by Kelly McCullough. And if I zoom through those I'll pick up Jennifer Fallon's LORD OF THE SHADOWS, book 3 in the Second Sons trilogy. Yeah.

Jess said...

Fiction on my lunch break: Evermore, Lynn Viehl.

Non-fiction before bed: Writer's Journey, Chris Vogler.

That's my system for reading, because fiction before bed keeps me up, and I get cranky without 7 hours of sleep.

Topaz said...

Kate Elliott's Jaran books

Dayna_Hart said...

Lions of Al-Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay. For the fourteenth time or so. :)

otherkatie said...

Just put down CATHERINE, CALLED BIRDY by Karen Cushman. It was outstanding.

2readornot said...

Rereading LADY KNIGHT by Tammy Pierce. Started CATEGORY 7 by Bill Evans, but despite my love of all things disaster, this one isn't doing it for me so far. Sigh.

EA Monroe said...

Fire in Beulah by Rilla Askew -- a novel set during the Tulsa, OK Race Riots. I'm catching up on my Okie roots.

Kathleen said...

The Light Ages by Ian R Macleod.

atmospheric period fantasy about Dickensian england, except instead of coal, everything is power by aether (magic mined from the ground), and controlled by guilds.

Anonymous said...

Just started "Special Topics in Calamity Physics" by Marisha Pessl; I like it, so far. Just finished "Talk Talk" by TC Boyle which I loved loved loved...although I'm a little iffy on the ending.

--calendula

David said...

No tym 4 rdng. Must wryt. Must kp cmnts bref.

AG said...

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

So Amazing!

joan said...

"Armadale" by Wilkie Collins & "Dial-a-Ghost" by Eva Ibbotson.

(Both are awesome so far.)

Jim Zoetewey said...

Rereading "The Doomsday Book" by Connie Willis.

It'll be the second or third time.

Helen said...

I just finished Stephenie Meyer's Twilight, trying to understand what made it so popular. And I did. It's so comforting to read about a weak stupid poor female in love with a strong smart rich guy who is perfect in everything. And it is a welcome twist that she is masochistic, and he is a vampire. What's not to like?

D said...

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy and Agile Web Development with Rails...

Christa M. Miller said...

I just finished an ARC of Joshua Henkin's latest MATRIMONY (blog tour). Next up is M.J. Rose's THE REINCARNATIONIST, also for the blog. For pleasure I have a crapload of books on my TBR list, but I'm looking at a collection of novellas called TRANSGRESSIONS or perhaps Updike's TERRORIST... depends on my mood!

Lupina said...

Anne LaMott's "Plan B" (she's honest, hilarious, earthy and spiritual all at once)
Nick Redfern's "Man-Monkey" about British Bigfoot (His 3 Men Seeking Monsters is too funny)
Eoin Colfer's "The Supernaturalist"
Just finished Ann Tyler's "Breathing Lessons" (left me breathless)

Heidi, The Thief Lord is one of my YA all-time faves.

Steve Axelrod said...

Tales of the Otori by Lian Hearn. Now complete in five volumes. Someone said it was SHOGUN meets THE LORD OF THE RINGS. Not perfect, but close enough. Gorgeous prose tht reads as if it was exquisitely translated from the Japanese. Great characters, high adventure, epic sweep, intimate detail. In order:

Heaven's Net is Wide
Across the Nightingale Floor
Grass for his Pillow
Brilliance of the Moon
The Harsh Cry of the Heron

Collect 'em all.

Lauren said...

Right now it's David Lubar's SLEEPING FRESHMEN NEVER LIE, a humorous YA "boy book."

And for work, a Yale University Press tome called ASSESSING READING.

Jaye Wells said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jennifer said...

I read FAT KID RULES THE WORLD a few weeks ago and haven't been able to get into any other book since. It was that amazing. So, I'm reading it again.

KL Going is brilliant.

Lacy said...

Re-reading "The Thief Lord" by Cornelia Funke for inspiration.

Jaye Wells said...

I'm finally reading THE HISTORIAN by Elizabeth Kostova. Almost done. I'm also reading MY INVENTED COUNTRY by Isabelle Allende, and I'm listening to the ANANSI BOYS (Neil Gaiman) audio book in my car.

The Writers' Group said...

THE RIVER WIFE by Jonis Agee and LAST NIGHT I DREAMED OF PEACE: DIARY OF DANG THUY TRAM.

I expect the former to win national awards and have been looking forward to the latter for over a year. Both are exquisite.

Amy

Helen said...

Oh wow, that is so weird. I am currently reading Twilight, wondering the same thing as Helen above and coming to the same conclusion. Did my future self travel back in time to let me know I shouldn't be wasting my time?

Conduit said...

I'm just about to start reading Jack's Return Home by Ted Lewis for at least the fifth time. It's a favourite of mine, and was filmed as Get Carter with Michale Caine in the early seventies (not to be confused with the abysmal remake with Sly Stallone). It's a violent revenge thriller that flits between the brutal and the beautiful, sometimes within a sentence. While not quite one of my 'once-a-year' books, it's close. Ted Lewis is a big influence on my writing.

My TBR pile is being whittled down, and a copy of The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski is next up, but I'm not sure I'm looking forward to that one.

Ello said...

Thousand Splendid Suns
Free Food for Millionaires
Stolen Child

And waiting to get my copy of Weirdly where Blogger Bernita's story will be showcased!

J M Peltier said...

From the Corner of His Eye by Dean Koontz

and

Old Man's War by John Scalzi

I'm just glad you didn't ask yesterday when I'd have to cop to reading Eragon.

Wait...Ah, dang!

dramabird said...

Just finished:
What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman

Currently:
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Up next:
The Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill (aka Joe King, aka Stephen King's son)

Char said...

THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE PINK CARNATION, by Lauren Willig

I have a whole stack of historical-set mysteries from the library and this is the one that called to me the most. I'd call it more a spy novel with a romance, however, and I like how it alternates between the present day researcher character and the historical plot. The characters are simply wonderful, especially Amy. I'm a bit peeved at the hero presently (I'm currently on page 246), but he's got room before The End to redeem himself. :)

Tammie said...

Finished reading The Road based on this boards recommendation and glad I did.

Now I'm reading Owls Well That Ends Well - a cozy mystery -something I have never read and figured I'd give it a try.

Michele Lee said...

A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore. I'm absolutely loving it.

Pam Halter said...

Gavin Goodfellow and the Lure of Burnt Swamp by Candy Abbott.

Dave Wood said...

Just finished "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel. It started to lose me three quarters of the way through, then yanked me back in the last 30 pages or so by throwing everything that came before into doubt. An interesting think, that.

Before that was "In the Woods" by Tana French. I've been looking around to see where my writing fits in with what's being published. Kind of mystery meets literary. This book had some similarities but lots more differences. It's the closest match I've found, and I'd sure like to see Ms. French's query letter, but I'm glad they're not too similar. The book left me actively disliking the protagonist and feeling like the mystery was a bit of a bait-and-switch. Don't think I'll mention the book in my queries.

And mixed in there somewhere was a blood-spattered horror book titled "Dead Sea." Kind of fun and certainly a quick read. I have an idea for a zombie book and I wanted to see what others are doing with the idea.

In amongst the fiction I've been reading some historical non-fiction as background. "Trigger" sounds really cool; I think I'll look at that next.

Michelle said...

Lottery by Patricia Wood

Anne-Marie said...

The Monkey's Raincoat by Robert Crais.

Linnea said...

Research material for my WIP.
"Everyday Life in Babylon and Assyria" by Georges Contenau and "Babylon" by Joan Oates. Boring for some, but I like it.

original bran fan said...

A WRINKLE IN TIME. Madeline L'Engle just passed away and I thought I should re-read that novel.

I feel badly saying this but I liked that novel better when I was a child.

Betsy said...

The Radiant Seas
by Catherine Asaro
(at work - science fiction)

Open Season
by C.J. Box
(before bed - western/mystery)

From Homer to Harry Potter: A Handbook on Myth and Fantasy
by Matthew Dickerson and David O'Hara
(for school - nonfiction/critical theory).


All worthwhile so far.

And Yay! for Amanda H. for starting with Son of Avonar. Carol Berg has become one of my favorite authors, and a lovely woman in person as well.

Great thread!

Jenny said...

Jim Zoetewey,

Thanks for mentioning The Doomsday Book. I had read it years ago and loved it, but I couldn't remember its title. When you cited it I realized that was the book I was trying to remember.

I was trying to tell someone about it only a few weeks ago. So now I know who wrote it! A wonderful recreation of the world of the Black Plague.

I read about 6 chapters of Bradshaw's DARK NORTH before dinner, and it is as good as I hoped it would be.

Chumplet said...

I'm reading SEABISCUIT, by... um.... well, it's at home so I can't remember the author.

MLM said...

LOVE AND RESPECT
by Dr. Emerson Eggerichs
It's kicking my hiney.

Loquacious Me said...

I just finished ANANSI BOYS by Neil Gaiman.

Tom Burchfield said...

I'm reading "Mary" Nabokov's first novel. It reads like one, kind of, but there are those wonderful springy sentences and evocative descriptions. I just love pouring it into my head.

Also: "Caring for the Country" by Howard Rabinowitz (about the lives of rural physicians) and
"Bram Stoker and the Man Who Was Dracula" by Barbara Belford, both of which are research for my own novel, which you can read about this week at my own blog at:

http://tbdeluxe.blogspot.com/

Lora T. said...

I just finished reading THE CHILDREN OF HURIN by JRR Tolkien. I need to go to the library this weekend...

mkcbunny said...

The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon.

I started On Chesil Beach, by Ian McEwen, but I will probably finish Policemen and then go back to Beach.

Spartezda said...

CETAGANDA, by Lois McMaster Bujold. I'm rereading it for the . . . um, well, I've lost count of the number of times I've read it. Just finished rereading A CIVIL CAMPAIGN, too.

Am also starting 1634: THE BALTIC WAR, by Eric Flint and David Weber, because I am aching to know what happens to Oliver Cromwell (no, seriously. Alternate history).

Church Lady said...

Hattie Big Sky by Kirby Larson

I love the West, and this is a great book about early 1900s homesteads in Montana.

Janniel said...

Fannie Flagg is always fun.

I'm alternating between ARABIA, THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS by Johnathan Raban as background for a WIP; and THE BINGO QUEENS OF PARADISE by June Park.

Raban is a wonderful travel writer, but BINGO QUEENS has taken an unexpected turn. I may not be alternating much longer.

Jordyn said...

I'm in the middle of reading (for something like the third time) Sarah Dessen's THE TRUTH ABOUT FOREVER. One of my favorite quotes from which is this one...

"Then, about a year and a half too late, it hit me. I was never going to be perfect."

original bran fan said...

Funny that there are very few repeats on this thread. Everyone is reading something different. There doesn't seem to be one "big" book that is the "must read" of the season.

Arjay said...

Hooked by Les Edgerton

Topher1961 said...

Just finished
Water for Elephants and
Ordinary Wolves (must read) and have started Beach Music

Isak said...

Selling Your Story in 60 Seconds by Michael Hauge.

A Paperback Writer said...

The Invention of Hugo Cabret and Girl in a Cage for YA stuff.
The Literary Traveller's Guide to Edinburgh and Emily Cockayne's Hubbub: Filth, Noise, and Stench in England for non-fiction.

Angelle Trieste said...

Ptolemy's Gate by Jonathan Stroud

Bakerman said...

After years of avoidance, Jack Kerouac's ON THE ROAD (original version).

Couldn't get past chapter 7, roughly thirty pages. Unique writing style, however, which is what I expected.

Had a similar experience with ANGELA'S ASHES - the telling of a familiar story. No surprises. Yet, the first page was one of the best examples of gorilla marketing* since the advent of Madison Avenue.

*Maximum results from minimal resources

Anonymous said...

"Beauty" by Robin McKinley. I've read it before, and I need a familiar book right now.

Kadi Easley said...

"Cross Your Heart and Hope to Die", by Nancy Martin. A Blackbird sisters mystery.

A fun romp through society with a dead body throw in for excitement.

Crystal Alexander said...

I'm reading "Queen's Own Fool" by

It's a very interesting twist on the history of the queen of Scots.



-Crystal Alexander
P.S. Thanks for your encouragement on finding an agent. I think being a 16 year old writer hinders many agents from wanting to review my work. Got any tips?

cate said...

MIDDLESEX by Jeffrey Eugenides, but picked up STOP THAT GIRL by Elizabeth McKenzie today, and was totally hooked after sneaking a peek at the first page while my daughter was occupied with blocks. Plus, McKenzie is my neighbor here in Santa Cruz.

Jennifer L. Griffith said...

Where Rivers Change Directions
by Mark Spragg

The Road
by Cormac McCarthy

The Bean Trees
by Barbara Kingsolver

Yes, I have three going at one time.

bucketgirl said...

The complete Nero Wolfe series by Rex Stout, in chrono order.

dan said...

Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope. But I only just started.

Bakerman said...

RE: "I think being a 16 year old writer hinders many agents from wanting to review my work. Got any tips?" - Crystal Alexander

Sixteen or sixty, acquiring an agent is a hit or miss proposition. Stay in the game and you’re bound to get lucky. As a minor, however, entering into a legal contract is another matter entirely; be sure you have a parent or trustworthy guardian at the ready.

Also read Nathan's tips listed on the main page, a reliable path to impressing an agent and getting published. If your work is ready for market, age will be a minor factor.

In the meantime, if you want to be a good writer, keeping writing. If you want to be a great writer, live a little - experience all you can. Get to know the stars, the moon in its phases - and before you know it, we'll be reading your books and experiencing your travels. Good luck!

Kate said...

Robin Hobb's Liveship Traders book 2: The Mad Ship.

Not as good as the Farseer or Tawny Man trilogies, but still a great read!

reality said...

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Mary Witzl said...

The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy. Actually, I'm re-reading it. This is a habit I have when I enjoy a book. I'm not a fan of watching movies again and again, but if I really like a book, I almost always want to read it several times.

Eric G. said...

DEVILISH by Maureen Johnson

PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS, BOOK 2 by Rick Riordan

THE BONE COLLECTOR by Jeffrey Deaver

Lafreya said...

Hunting in Harlem by Mat Johnson

Coal Black Horse by Robert Olmstead

Southern Writer said...

CICADA by Eric Laing and WHEN MY SISTER WAS CLEOPATRA MOON by Frances Park.

Josephine Damian said...

Wendy/Anon 11:32 - Any Julian Barnes is worthwhile, but agree that "A & G" can't compare to his others, especially "Flaubert's Parrot." Agree that George was more compelling than Arthur.

Katie: A gal in my book club raved about the Lymond series; said it's kind of a slow start, but entirely worthwhile sticking with it. I have the entire series and plan on diving into the whole saga as soon as I finish grad school.

Gina and Original Bran Fan: I too plan on revisiting "Wrinkle" after all these years.

I just started Chelsea Cain's "Heart Sick" yesterday, and am deep into a classic satire of writers and the NY Literary world by Dawn Powell - "Turn, Magic Wheel."

Thought I'd include that book's first line: "Some fine day I'll have to pay, Dennis thought, you can't sacrifice everything in life to curiosity."

Lupina said...

I must agree with Bran Fan's observation..I was also surprised to see that everyone's reading list is unique.

How about a column devoted to: "I'll never get that 30-6000 minutes of my life back - what I wish I had NOT read recently" lists? I, for one, have read a real stinker that still annoys me to think about.

Derek said...

Divisadero, by Michael Ondaatje. I just finished Kiran Desai's The Inheritance of Loss.

Vinnie Sorce said...

Don't have the title right here on my desk but it's a Jonathan Kellerman book. Just recently finished Saira Rao's "Chambermaid" which recent news says is being madae into a TV series, http://www.sairarao.com/News/chambermaid-goes-to-hollywood

I met her in NY recently, what a lovely woman...

Andrea said...

THE ULTIMATE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY Douglas Adams. Ultimate only because it's all 5 in one binding.

Marlene Dotterer said...

Wait. Do you just read one book at a time?

The Singularity is Near by Ray Kurzweil - dense stuff. It's on the bedstand.

Einstein by Walter Isaacson. In the living room by the easy chair.

The New Time Travelers by David Toomey. Kitchen table.

I'm hitting some fiction next!

serenity said...

READING LOLITA IN TEHRAN: A Memoir in Books, by Azar Nafisi. It's really beautiful, and it has officially replaced any obligation I felt to actually read LOLITA.

Crystal Alexander said...

Thanks Bakerman, for the information and inspiration!
:D

-Crystal Alexander

Julie K. Rose said...

Awesome question! Now my library wishlist is significantly longer (I'm especially interested in picking up the Roman Britain books by Gillian Bradshaw).

On my last trip, I controlled the urge to reread Good Omens and instead picked up The Plague Tales by Ann Benson. I'm also reading a stack of non-fiction on the origins of plainchant.

Anonymous said...

The Atrocity Archives by Charles Stross

cyn said...

labyrinth by kate mosse.

picked it up on a lark with a buy 2 get 3 deal in london.

this after i returned court of the air by stephen hunt. i was three chapters in and the story simply didn't draw me.

Subservient No More said...

I'm finishing up The English Patient. Last week I read The Accidental by Ali Smith and I really enjoyed that. I wanted to mention that one because it's great and I haven't found many people who have heard of it.

Kanani said...

Well, I'm reading "Steps In Time" by Fred Astaire. Yup, that Fred Astaire, written in the 1950's. Thoroughly light and enjoyable read.

I'm also reading a book about Emily Dickinson.

Alison_C said...

MIND DESIGN AND MINIMAL SYNTAX, but that's only because I'm taking a class ... mostly.
lis

Demon Hunter said...

I just finished reading THE ROAD by Cormac McCarthy and I AM LEGEND by Richard Matheson. I am currently reading CIRCUS OF THE DAMNED by Laurell K. Hamilton, THE LIVING BLOOD by Tananarive Due, and DARK SYMPHONY by Christine Feehan. Then I'll read THE LOVELY BONES by Alice Sebold and THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE by Shirley Jackson.

P.G said...

I am reading Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde. I just am loving the Thursday Next series.

Katrina Stonoff said...

Wow, we're all over the library!

Mine is TRIANGLE by Katharine Weber, about the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire that killed about 150 people in 1911.

Eric Orchard said...

I am reading Diana-Wynne Jones' The lives of Christopher Chant and Borges' Book of Imaginary Beings.Thanks for asking.

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